Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'car'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Informatii generale
    • Anunturi importante
    • Bine ai venit
    • Proiecte RST
  • Sectiunea tehnica
    • Exploituri
    • Challenges (CTF)
    • Bug Bounty
    • Programare
    • Securitate web
    • Reverse engineering & exploit development
    • Mobile security
    • Sisteme de operare si discutii hardware
    • Electronica
    • Wireless Pentesting
    • Black SEO & monetizare
  • Tutoriale
    • Tutoriale in romana
    • Tutoriale in engleza
    • Tutoriale video
  • Programe
    • Programe hacking
    • Programe securitate
    • Programe utile
    • Free stuff
  • Discutii generale
    • RST Market
    • Off-topic
    • Discutii incepatori
    • Stiri securitate
    • Linkuri
    • Cosul de gunoi
  • Club Test's Topics
  • Clubul saraciei absolute's Topics
  • Chernobyl Hackers's Topics
  • Programming & Fun's Jokes / Funny pictures (programming related!)
  • Programming & Fun's Programming
  • Programming & Fun's Programming challenges
  • Bani pă net's Topics
  • Cumparaturi online's Topics
  • Web Development's Forum
  • 3D Print's Topics

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation

Found 3 results

  1. THE AVERAGE AUTOMOBILE today isn’t necessarily secured against hackers, so much as obscured from them: Digitally controlling a car’s electronics remains an arcane, specialized skill among security researchers. But that’s changing fast. And soon, it could take as little as $60 and a laptop to begin messing around with a car’s digital innards. Tomorrow at the Black Hat Asia security conference in Singapore, 24-year-old Eric Evenchick plans to present a new device he calls the CANtact. The open source board, which he hopes to sell for between $60 and $100, connects on one end to a computer’s USB
  2. CANCUN–When (or if) people think about the security of the devices they interact with and use on a daily basis, the machines that run their local car wash probably aren’t high up on that list. But, like everything else with a computer for a brain these days, those machines are connected to the Internet. And Billy Rios can hack them. Rios has spent years pulling apart the innards of all kinds of automation equipment, mostly in the ICS and SCADA realms. But now that TVs, parking meters, dishwashers and everything else under the sun comes with an embedded Web server and other potential targets, h
  3. The problem was discovered by the Allgemeiner Deutscher Automobil-Club (ADAC), a German motoring association, and was verified on several models of BMW cars. The attack took advantage of a feature that allows drivers who have been locked out of their vehicles to request remote unlocking of their car from a BMW assistance line. “They were able to reverse engineer some of the software that we use for our telematics,” said Dave Buchko , a BMW spokesman. “With that they were able to mimic the BMW server.” The auto maker has already started sending out software patches to the 2.2 million cars equip
×
×
  • Create New...