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Found 4 results

  1. Fac scripturi de copiere continut in masa de pe site-uri dorite, pot trece de logare/securitate de protejare a continutului. Datele vor fi puse intr-o baza de date Mysql sau pot fi puse direct si pe site-ul in care doriti sa se copie continutul. Se poate seta scriptul pentru continut zilnic si sa nu fie duplicat. Pentru detalii Pm. Pretul difera in functie de dificultate si cerinte.
  2. A group of technology companies, non-profits and privacy and human rights organizations have sent a letter to President Barack Obama, the director of national intelligence and a wide range of Congressional leaders, calling for an end to the bulk collection of phone metadata under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act. The letter, sent by dozens of organizations and companies, comes at a time when legislators in the United States are considering a new bill that would repeal the Patriot Act altogether. That measure likely will face stiff opposition in the House of Representatives, but less-sweeping reforms may be on the table as well. In the letter, representatives from the EFF, CloudFlare, Silent Circle, the ACLU, Mozilla, Human Rights Watch and many other organizations say that whatever form the changes take, Section 215 collection needs to end once and for all. “There must be a clear, strong, and effective end to bulk collection practices under the USA PATRIOT Act, including under the Section 215 records authority and the Section 214 authority regarding pen registers and trap & trace devices. Any collection that does occur under those authorities should have appropriate safeguards in place to protect privacy and users’ rights,” the letter says. The legal authority for the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of telephone metadata derives from Section 215 of the Patriot Act, and that section is due to expire on June 1. Lawmakers are considering a variety of possible reforms to the authority, but many in the security, technology and privacy communities have been advocating for the elimination of that authority altogether. In 2014, President Obama released a plan that would change the bulk collection under Section 215 and would keep all of the records with the telecom providers. The government would then need to get orders from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court in order to access specific records. In addition to calling for an end to the Section 215 bulk collection, the organizations that sent the new letter to Obama and lawmakers said that any bill must “contain transparency and accountability mechanisms for both government and company reporting, as well as an appropriate declassification regime for Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court decisions.” The Section 215 bulk collection was the first piece of the massive surveillance revelations from Edward Snowden that began in 2013. Though many other NSA programs have been revealed in the ensuing two years, the telephone metadata collection has remained one of more controversial ones. “It has been nearly two years since the first news stories revealed the scope of the United States’ surveillance and bulk collection activities. Now is the time to take on meaningful legislative reforms to the nation’s surveillance programs that maintain national security while preserving privacy, transparency, and accountability. We strongly encourage both the White House and Members of Congress to support the above reforms and oppose any efforts to enact any legislation that does not address them,” the letter says. Source
  3. Vand 150 bucati Raspberry Pi 2 Model B: Raspberry Pi 2 Model B | Raspberry Pi noi noute, sigilate, 175.99 RON / buc (include TVA + transport gratuit). In Romania asa ceva se vinde la 209 RON + transport (teguna.ro sau robofun.ro). Nu le dau la bucata, doar toate 150 la bulk.
  4. The law that the Obama administration cites to allow bulk telephone metadata collection expires on June 1, and the FBI has already begun lobbying to keep Section 215 of the Patriot Act from expiring. Bad guys "going dark" using encryption, the FBI says, is one of the reasons why the government needs to collect the metadata of every phone call made to and from the United States. Robert Anderson, the FBI’s chief of the Criminal, Cyber, Response, and Services Branch, told reporters during a roundtable discussion Tuesday that the Patriot Act is necessary because encrypted communications are becoming more commonplace in the wake of the Edward Snowden disclosures. "In the last two to three years, that whole ‘going dark’ thing went from a crawl to a flat-out sprint because the technology is changing so rapidly," Anderson said. Joseph Demarest, assistant director of the FBI's Cyber Division, told reporters that if Section 215 expires, "Obviously it’s going to impact what we do as an organization and certainly on cyber." The comments, especially as they relate to encryption, are part of a growing chorus of calls—from as high as President Barack Obama—that the government needs Silicon Valley's assistance for backdoors into encrypted tech products like the iPhone. Silicon Valley has (at least publicly) shunned the administration's attempts to get backdoors into their products. And while no legislation at the moment requires them to comply, the nation's spy apparatus and others are turning their attention toward not losing the bulk telephone metadata spying program that spun heads when The Guardian—armed with classified documents from Snowden—exposed it in 2013. As it turns out, the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court that was authorizing the program was doing so under the authority of Section 215 of the Patriot Act. While many leading lawmakers are behind renewing the program, there are plenty of reasons why it should expire come June. According to the EFF: One federal judge has upheld the program while another has declared it unconstitutional. A Supreme Court showdown over the snooping isn't likely to happen any time soon. There's plenty of rhetoric on all sides of the issue, too. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) said Section 215 should never expire. House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) are big fans of Section 215. Sens. Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Martin Heinrich (D-NM) said that "none of the claims appear to hold up to scrutiny" that the bulk metadata collection program prevents terrorism. When Congress publicly re-authorized Section 215 three years ago, the public didn't know that lawmakers were secretly approving the bulk telephone metadata program. And some lawmakers who had voted for re-authorization claimed that they didn't even know about the bulk collection program. At least this time, when it comes up for a vote in the coming months, lawmakers can't claim that they didn't know they were voting to allow the government to scoop up data that includes phone numbers of parties involved in calls, calling card numbers, the time and duration of the calls, and the international mobile subscriber identity number for mobile callers. The database is said to have more than 1 trillion records. Source
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