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Found 9 results

  1. We live in the social mobile era, where we all collect and share vast amounts of data about ourselves and others. By handing over that data to corporations and governments we are promised great benefits in everything from our health and our wealth to our safety from criminals. But of course there are dangers too and I've been hearing some horror stories about when Big Data becomes Big Brother. The first was from one of the technology industry's more colourful figures. John McAfee, who is in London this week for the Infosecurity Europe conference, is the man who virtually invented the anti-viru
  2. Without public notice or debate, the Obama administration has expanded the National Security Agency's warrantless surveillance of Americans' international Internet traffic to search for evidence of malicious computer hacking, according to classified NSA documents. In mid-2012, Justice Department lawyers wrote two secret memos permitting the spy agency to begin hunting on Internet cables, without a warrant and on American soil, for data linked to computer intrusions originating abroad—including traffic that flows to suspicious Internet addresses or contains malware, the documents show. The Just
  3. AROUND THE SAME time the US and Israel were already developing and unleashing Stuxnet on computers in Iran, using five zero-day exploits to get the digital weapon onto machines there, the government realized it needed a policy for how it should handle zero-day vulnerabilities, according to a new document obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. The document, found among a handful of heavily redacted pages released after the civil liberties group sued the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to obtain them, sheds light on the backstory behind the development of the government’
  4. Yahoo received nearly 5,000 requests for user data from the United States government in the last six months of 2014 and disclosed some content in nearly 25 percent of those cases. The company said in its new transparency report that it received between 0-999 National Security Letters from the U.S. government, too. The latest report from Yahoo on government requests covers the period of July through December of 2014 and the company reported 4,865 total requests from the U.S. during that period. Those requests covered a total of 9,752 user accounts and the company disclosed some content in 1,157
  5. The Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Criminal Rules voted 11-1 to modify a federal rule – known as Rule 41 – that expands hacking authority for the FBI, the National Journal reported on Monday, citing a Department of Justice (DOJ) spokesperson. As the rule stands, judges can only approve search warrants for materials within their own judicial district – modified, courts would have the ability to grant search warrants for electronic information located outside their judicial district, the report indicates. A variety of organizations – including Google and a number of other civil rights
  6. In the wake of news-making attacks on Sony Pictures, Home Depot and many others, the federal government is establishing a new information integration center to focus on cyber threats. The center will analyze intelligence contributed by several agencies, along with the private sector, a model that will face some serious hurdles. The proposed Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center will fall under the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and it will not be responsible for actually gathering any threat intelligence. Rather, it will serve as an aggregation point for information col
  7. Twitter has seen a surge in government requests for user information, according to its latest transparency report. The social media platform has seen a 40% rise in the number of requests from governments around the world since its last report, in July 2014. Hundreds came from the government of Turkey, which has previously attempted to ban Twitter. The most requests came from the US government. All of the large internet companies, including Google, Facebook and Yahoo, now release regular transparency reports in order to keep users informed about how much data is shared with governments. It is p
  8. Telecoms security has been in and out of the headlines for almost two years now, ever since patriot/traitor/hero/villain (delete as your opinion dictates) Edward Snowden revealed the PRISM campaign and the rest in 2013. We've since learned that GCHQ has a pretty tight grip on the communications flowing around the UK and the rest of the world. So you'd think the folks at the top at GCHQ and the government would be adept at keeping their own comms secure. Not so, it seems. Sneak was amused to read that David Cameron received a prank phone call from someone who managed to bypass the switchboard s
  9. The number of subpoenas, total orders and warrants that the United States government delivered to Verizon all dropped in the second half of 2014, according to the company’s latest transparency report. The giant telecom provider released data on Thursday that showed a decrease in subpoenas of about 10 percent from the first half of last year to the second half. The volume of pen register and trap and trace orders fell by a little less than 10 percent, and the number of warrants served on Verizon by law enforcement also dropped from 14,977 to 13,050. Verizon officials said in the report that the
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