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Found 6 results

  1. Erroare: An unhandled exception of type 'System.IO.FileNotFoundException' occurred in System.Windows.Forms.dll Additional information: Could not load file or assembly 'TCtrl Connection, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null' or one of its dependencies. The system cannot find the file specified. Source: Imports Admin_Tool_4s Public Class Form2 Dim TCTRLCon As Connection Private Sub Button8_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles Button8.Click TCTRLCon.Kick(TextBox1.Text) End Sub Private Sub Form2_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load TCTRLCon = New Connection("#", #) TCTRLCon.Connect() TCTRLCon.Login("#", "#") End Sub Private Sub TextBox1_TextChanged(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles TextBox1.TextChanged End Sub End Class Cand deschid form2.vb primesc eroare asta... An unhandled exception of type 'System.IO.FileNotFoundException' occurred in System.Windows.Forms.dll Additional information: Could not load file or assembly 'TCtrl Connection, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null' or one of its dependencies. The system cannot find the file specified.
  2. # Affected software: phplist # Type of vulnerability: insecure object reference # URL:phplist.com # Discovered by: Provensec # Website: http://www.provensec.com #version: phpList ltd. - v3.0.10 # Proof of concept insecure object refrenced on page deltetation vuln param:delete example: http://demo.phplist.com/lists/admin/?page=send&delete=2&tk=035d99 ref: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Testing_for_Insecure_Direct_Object_References_%28OTG-AUTHZ-004%29 Source
  3. XP is a little more complicated than newer systems due to the use of a single driver for both port and miniport; however, getting the original pointers is fairly straight forward depending on how you do it. IRP_MJ_SCSI & DriverStartIo - Method 1 (Windows XP) A common method is to programmatically disassemble the miniport's DriverEntry, looking for the code which initializes the driver's object, then you can extract and calculate the addresses from "mov [esi+30h], offset" and "mov [esi+74h], offset" for DriverStartIo and IRP_MJ_SCSI respectively. The obvious problem with this method is the initialization code may not be in DriverEntry, but a sub function called from it (it may even be necessary to follow jumps). It's also not guaranteed that the instruction will use esi as the pointer to the driver object or an immediate for the function address, in fact you're probably going to have to account for quite a few different instructions. IRP_MJ_SCSI & DriverStartIo - Method 2 (Windows XP) In my tests, it was possible to simply call the DriverEntry of the miniport driver with the parameters from your own driver entry, thus having the miniport set up your driver's object as if it were its own. The only issue with this method is if the driver uses GsDriverEntry (it usually does), the entry point will be invalidated after the driver is initialized, so you cannot call it. To deal with GsDriverEntry you'd first need to load the original image from disk, then search until you reach an unconditional relative jump (this is the offset to real entry point and you can use it to calculate the same address within the loaded driver). IRP_MJ_SCSI (Windows Vista+) On newer systems, things are wonderfully easier: There's no DriverStartIo field and you can initialize all the major functions in your DriverObject with a call to AtaPortInitialize, ScsiPortInitialize, or StorPortInitialize which are all exported from the relevant port drivers (ataport.sys, scsiport.sys, or storport.sys). Bypassing Inline Hooks Although not many bootkits actually perform inline hooking on miniports, it's worth taking care of. You'll need to read a the original miniport or port driver's file into memory, then do a bit of pointer math to calculate the addresses of IRP_MJ_SCSI or DriverStartIo within the clean image. I'm not too sure of the best way to call the clean functions, but here are 2 viable methods to chose from. Trampoline Usually a hook is placed within the first few bytes of a function, so you can simply read and relocate the first few bytes from the clean function into a buffer, then append it with a jump to the same offset within the real driver(this is the same way a hooking engine would call the unhooked version of a function). Manual Mapping A more difficult but effective method is to manually map a clean copy of the driver into memory, then relocate it so that all absolute instructions will reference the real driver, meaning you don't have to worry about initializing any global variables or such. Creating a Clean Call Path Due to the fact a lot of bootkits run persistence threads for replacing any driver object hooks which get removed, you don't want to unhook the real driver but instead create a parallel one, so you can maintain your own hook-free call path. Step 1 (XP & Vista) Get the device object for the boot disk miniport, this is usually \Device\Harddisk0\Dr0 Use the size field of the device object to allocate some non paged memory and copy the entire object (this is your clean miniport). Set the DriverObject field to point to your own driver's object, in which you've set the IRP_MJ_SCSI and DriverStartIo field appropriately (DriverStartIo can be skipped on Vista+). Step 2 (XP Only) Set the DeviceExtension field of your clean miniport device object to point to directly after its device object (DeviceObject + sizeof(DEVICE_OBJECT)). Get the address stored at offset 0x5C into your clean miniport's device extension and check it's valid (this is the address of the corresponding port's device extension). Read the addresses stored at offset 0x0C into the port's device extension (this is the address of the port's device object). Use the size field of the port's device object to allocate some non paged memory and copy the entire object (this is your clean port). Set the DeviceExtension field of your clean port's device object to point to directly after its device object (DeviceObject + sizeof(DEVICE_OBJECT)). Set the DriverObject field of your clean port's device object to point to your own driver's object, in which you've set the IRP_MJ_SCSI field appropriately. Change offset 0x5C into your clean miniport's device extension to contain the address of the clean port's device extension. Set offset 0x0C into the clean port's device extension to contain the address of the clean port's device object. Using the Clean Path You're going to need to build a raw SCSI request which is pretty complicated; however, the Chinese are already a step ahead, so you can look to this example for help (This request can be issued by passing the clean miniport device object and the IRP to IofCallDriver). It's important to note that miniport drivers are PnP, so if you don't create any devices (IoCreateDevice): the driver will be unloaded as soon as DriverEntry returns, if you do: the driver can't be unloaded at all. Although it's not recommended, you can set the driver back to a legacy driver by setting the AddDevice pointer within the driver's extension to 0, allowing the driver to be unloaded normally. Conclusion This concludes my 3 part series, any feedback in the comments would be greatly appreciated and will be taken into consideration when I create a whitepaper version of the series in a few weeks. Other resources of note Debugging TDL4 Subverting Bootkits using the Crash Dump Driver Stack Exposing Bootkits With BIOS Emulation Source
  4. Part 1 .: https://rstforums.com/forum/98013-bootkit-disk-forensics-1-a.rst As I explained in the previous article: DriverStartIo is used by older miniports to actually perform the disk I/O, it takes 2 parameters (a device object and an IRP), exactly the same as IoCallDriver does. The call to DriverStartIo is done with IoStartPacket; however, the device object passed is not that of the miniport, but instead a device associated with the port the target disk is connected to (in my case IdePort1). IRP_MJ_SCSI points to IdePortDispatch in atapi.sys, by disassembling it we can see exactly how the required device object is retrieved from the DeviceExtension field of the miniport's device object. The call logic is something like this: Get the miniport's device extension from its device object (passed to us in the call). Get IdePort1's device extension from offset 0x5C into the miniport's device extension. Get IdePort1's device object from offset 0x0C into its device extension. Call IoStartPacket with the IRP and IdePort1's device object. As both the miniport and IdePort devices are created by atapi.sys, the DriverObject field of both devices' objects point to the same driver object; thus, hooking DriverStartIo is as simple as replacing the address in the driver's object. Detecting DriverStartIo hook with WinDbg For basic DriverStartIo hook detection we can simply follow the same process as for major function hooks: First, we find the boot disk and list it's stack. As I explained in the previous article, modifications made by TDL4 will cause the !drvobj and !devobj commands to think the object is invalid, it's not. You will probably want to check each driver object in the stack (for the invalid DeviceObject you can again use "dt _DEVICE_OBJECT <address>" to find the DriverObject field). With most bootkits, the lowest level driver is always the one hooked, so I'll use this in my example. You can see here that DriverStartIo isn't hooked because the address resolve to its proper symbol; however, this isn't actually the real driver object. Earlier i explained that IoStartPacket is always called with the device object of IdePort1, not the disk miniport: This means that when IoStartPacket called DriverStartIo internally, it does so by getting the driver object from the DriverObject field of IdePort1's device object, then getting the DriverStartIo field from that. Obviously this means that to hook DriverStartIo, one could simply just create a copy of atapi's driver object, with the DriverStartIo field modified, then set the DriverObject field of IdePort1's device object to point to the new, malicious driver object (this way on IdePort1 will point to the hooked driver, the rest will point to the original). As it happens TDL4 actually does the opposite, it hooks the real atapi driver object, then replaces the DriverObject field of the disk miniport's device object with the address of an identical driver object, without the DriverStartIo field modified.). If you know what you're looking for, fake driver objects are easy to detect. All devices created by a driver should point the same driver object, so simply enumerating the devices created by the miniport's driver then making sure all the DriverObject fields point to the same address is all that's needed. This can be done a multitude of ways. Method 1: DrvObj The fake driver object will have the same name as the real one (in my case "\driver\atapi"), all you need to do is type "!drvobj \driver\atapi 2" to get the real driver's object (this is a downside of TDL4 hooking the real driver object instead of a spoofed one). Method 2: NextDevice Starting with the miniport device, enumerate devices using "dt _DEVICE_OBJECT <address>" and the NextDevice field of each device's object. We're looking for any DriverObject field that dosen't match that of the miniport (this is the real driver object). Method 3: DeviceExtension This is the least reliable way, as the device extension could change from system to system, but as I mentioned earlier: you can find IdePort1's device extension at offset 0x5C isn't the miniport's device extension, then from IdePort1's device extension you can find its device object at offset 0x0C (IdePort1's device object will point to the real driver object). We can actually find the DeviceObject in a single commands using this overly complicated WinDbg-C++ syntax: "dt _DEVICE_OBJECT poi(poi(@@C++(((nt!_DEVICE_OBJECT *)<address>)->DeviceExtension)+0x5C)+0x0C)", where "<address>" is the miniport device object. Source
  5. Windows Object Explorer 64-bit (WinObjEx64) WinObjEx64 is an advanced utility that lets you explore the Windows Object Manager namespace. For certain object types, you can double-click on it or use the "Properties..." toolbar button to get more information, such as description, attributes, resource usage etc. WinObjEx64 let you view and edit object-related security information if you have required access rights. System Requirements WinObjEx64 does not require administrative privileges. However administrative privilege is required to view much of the namespace and to edit object-related security information. WinObjEx64 works only on the following x64 Windows: Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10, including Server variants. WinObjEx64 does not work on Windows XP, Windows Vista is partially supported. We have no plans of their full support. In order to use all program features Windows must be booted in the DEBUG mode. Build WinObjEx64 comes with full source code. In order to build from source you need Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 U4 and later versions. Authors © 2015 WinObjEx64 Project Original WinObjEx © 2003 - 2005 Four-F Acknowledgements We would like to thanks the following people for their contributions (in the alphabetical order): Andrew Ivlev aka Four-F - author of the original x86-32 WinObjEx Giuseppe Bonfa aka Evilcry - KDSubmarine author Mark Russinovich - author of the original proof-of-concept tool WinObj Microsoft WinDBG developers team Source and compiled binary here https://github.com/hfiref0x/WinObjEx64 Project files SHA1: https://github.com/hfiref0x/WinObjEx64/blob/master/Source/SHA1.hash Copy: 818bf9f0d4189347e9bd157a2810615109423e62 *Release\WinObjEx64.chm 957157318a64482f446b97c82afe786444b1b2ff *Release\WinObjEx64.exe 6f4df146c341d7f2dafbe5e3d1aee5f2c7b3488b *WinObjAdv\aboutDlg.c d0e500c0092000d73fd711a5d20c35b69f4ac447 *WinObjAdv\aboutDlg.h 74fcc74b3d7d7a4467869a888dcd4f67797ca156 *WinObjAdv\excepth.c 2ba8ded754090338b733797accdb696162866e75 *WinObjAdv\excepth.h fbad8de8cbc2eb1ed7612a495ac5e0206210d241 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SHA1 818bf9f0d4189347e9bd157a2810615109423e62 *WinObjEx64.chm 957157318a64482f446b97c82afe786444b1b2ff *WinObjEx64.exe Copyrights WinObjEx64 developed by WinObjEx64 Project group, in the alphabetical order: EP_X0FF MP_ART This program uses Windows Debugger Local Kernel Debugging Driver © Microsoft Corporation. Please use this thread for bugreports. Also take a note that Windows 10 is supported *AS IS* since it wasn't released yet, official support will be added after official release. Download Source
  6. Buna ziua tuturor, In cadrul unei sesiuni de recrutare prevazuta pentru luna aprilie la Bucuresti, firma de recrutare Cooptalis cauta, pentru unul din clientii ei francezi (o importanta firma ICT implantata in mai bine de 40 de tari) PHP Developeri cu experienta si care cunosc programarea orientata obiect, precum si limba franceza. Posturile sunt bazate in nordul Frantei (Lille). Daca doriti mai multe informatii despre aceasta oportunitate, va rog sa ma contactati : raluca.sandu@cooptalis.com !
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