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Found 4 results

  1. Custom rom sau stock? Firmware schimbat? Overclock? Ce launchere/gadgets folositi? Un screenshot la ecran? Sau dati voi alte detalii intr-un reply. Incep eu. HTC ONE M8, custom rom de pe xda, fara oc, fara laucher de pe playstore (Love HTC UI), niciun gadget, ss n-are rost ca n-am nimic special facut pe ecran si cam atat.
  2. SEC Consult has found a backdoor in Sony IPELA Engine IP Cameras, mainly used professionally by enterprises and authorities. This backdoor allows an attacker to run arbitrary code on the affected IP cameras. An attacker can use cameras to take a foothold in a network and launch further attacks, disrupt camera functionality, send manipulated images/video, add cameras into a Mirai-like botnet or to just simply spy on you. This vulnerability affects 80 different Sony camera models. Sony was informed by SEC Consult about the vulnerability and has since released updated firmware for the affected models. Further information about the backdoor, disclosure timeline, affected devices and updated firmware can be found in our advisory. This blog post has some highlights from the vulnerability analysis. This advisory is the result of research that started by uploading a recent firmware update file from a Sony camera into our cloud based firmware analysis system IoT Inspector. After a few minutes the analysis results were available. One result immediately caught our attention: Excerpt from IoT Inspector results So here we have two password hashes, one is for the user admin and was cracked immediately. The password is admin. This is no surprise as the default login credentials are admin:admin. The second password hash is much more interesting, it’s for the user root and it was found in two different files: /etc/init.d/SXX_directory and /usr/local/lib/libg5_usermanage.so.0.0.0 We can use the file system browser of IoT Inspector to have a look at the SXX_directory. Excerpt from IoT Inspector filesystem browser It looks like this startup script (called by /sbin/init/rcS during boot) is responsible for creating and populating the file /tmp/etc/passwd (/etc/passwd is a symlink to this file). A line for the user including a password hash is added, the shell is /bin/sh. Not good! So, what can we do if we can crack the hash? At this point we can assume that it's very likely we can login using UART pins on the PCB. This of course requires us to have physical access and to disassemble the device. The other locations where we could possibly use the password are Telnet and SSH, but both services are not available on the device … or are they? A quick string search in the firmware's filesystem for “telnet” shows that a CGI binary called prima-factory.cgi contains this string a few times. IDA Pro to the rescue! It seems this CGI has the power to do something with Telnet: The code in g5::cgifactory::factorySetTelnet() (in decompiled form below) is pretty straight forward. Based on input, the inetd daemon is killed or started: The inetd daemon gets its configuration from /etc/inetd.conf and inetd.conf is set up to launch Telnet So how can we reach this CGI functionality? The answer lies in the lighttpd binary. Lighttpd is an open source web server that was modified by Sony. Some custom code for HTTP request handling and authentication was added. Below is an excerpt from a data structure that maps the URI /command/prima-factory.cgi to the CGI in the file system. The authentication function is HandleFactory. HandleFactory decodes the HTTP Basic Authentication header and compares it to the username/password primana:primana. Now we have all ingredients to craft an attack that looks like this: Send HTTP requests to /command/prima-factory.cgi containing the “secret” request values cPoq2fi4cFk and zKw2hEr9and use primana:primana for HTTP authentication. This starts the Telnet service on the device. Login using the cracked root credentials via Telnet. Note: We have not cracked the root password, but it's only a matter of time until someone will. The user primana has access to other functionality intended for device testing or factory calibration(?). There is another user named debug with the password popeyeConnection that has access to other CGI functionality we didn't analyze further. We believe that this backdoor was introduced by Sony developers on purpose (maybe as a way to debug the device during development or factory functional testing) and not an "unauthorized third party" like in other cases (e.g. the Juniper ScreenOS Backdoor, CVE-2015-7755). We have asked Sony some questions regarding the nature of the backdoor, intended purpose, when it was introduced and how it was fixed, but they did not answer. For further information regarding affected devices and patched firmware, see our advisory. IoT Inspector now comes with a plugin that detects this vulnerability. For further information regarding affected devices and patched firmware, see our advisory. IoT Inspector now comes with a plugin that detects this vulnerability. Source
  3. Salut. Stie cineva unde gasesc un cod sa decodez un Sony Ericsson u10i.( gratuit). Am cautat si nu am gasit nimic bun. IMEI:356815038800786 CODAT ORANGE SPANIA.
  4. Millions of PSN gamers, who were hit by a massive data breach on Sony's Playstation network back in 2011, are finally being offered the opportunity to claim compensation from the company. Stateside victims of the hack attack – PSN, Qriocity and Sony Online Entertainment subscribers who held an account before 15 May 2011 – have been encouraged to file an online form as part of a settlement deal to end a class action lawsuit brought against the Japanese tech giant.A number of claims can be submitted by U.S. netizens affected by the assault on Sony's computer network systems. Victims can either claim one free game, up to three themes or a free subscription to Playstation Plus for three months for those subscribers not already signed up to that option. While those affected by identity theft can claim up to $2,500 in compensation. Sony, which offered a $15m settlement deal to PSN gamers in July last year, said: The proposed settlement offers payments equal to credit balances (if applicable credit balance is $2 or more) in inactive accounts, game and online service benefits for holders of active accounts, and reimbursements for certain out-of-pocket expenses from any identity theft proven to have resulted from the intrusions. In the UK, Sony was slapped with a £250,000 fine by the Information Commissioner's Office, after it concluded that the Data Protection Act had been violated following the 2011 hack attack. The personal info of millions of Brits – including names, addresses and account passwords – were stolen by malefactors who infiltrated Sony's PlayStation Network systems. In January 2013, Blighty's data cops concluded that the breach of around 77 million gamers could have been prevented if Sony had adequate security measures in place, such as hashing and salting log-ins and keeping system patches up to date. Despite that admonishment, Sony has refused to accept any responsibility for the attack. ® Source
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