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Found 4 results

  1. https://www.admin.md Astept sugestii in legatura cu functionalul sitului, ce pot sa adaug sau sa scot. Merci
  2. ICANN proposes websites associated to "commercial activity" will no longer be able to use WHOIS protection services. Under new guidelines proposed by MarkMonitor and others who represent the same industries that backed SOPA, domain holders with sites associated to "commercial activity" will no longer be able to protect their private information with WHOIS protection services. "Commercial activity" casts a wide net, which means that a vast number of domain holders will be affected. Your privacy provider could be forced to publish your contact data in WHOIS or even give it out to anyone who complains about your website, without due process. Why should a small business owner have to publicize her home address just to have a website? We think your privacy should be protected, regardless of whether your website is personal or commercial, and your confidential info should not be revealed without due process. If you agree, it’s time to tell ICANN. To view the new proposed rules, visit: Privacy & Proxy Services Accreditation Issues Policy. Source: https://www.respectourprivacy.com/
  3. Google leaked the complete hidden whois data attached to more than 282,000 domains registered through the company's Google Apps for Work service, a breach that could bite good and bad guys alike. The 282,867 domains counted by Cisco Systems' researchers account for 94 percent of the addresses Google Apps has registered through a partnership with registrar eNom. Among the services is one that charges an additional $6 per year to shield from public view all personal information included in domain name whois records. Rather than being published publicly, the information is promised to remain in the hands of eNom except when it receives a court order to turn it over. Starting in mid 2013, a software defect in Google Apps started leaking the data, including names, phone numbers, physical addresses, e-mail addresses, and more. The bug caused the data to become public once a domain registration was renewed. Cisco's Talos Security Intelligence and Research Group discovered it on February 19, and five days later the leak was plugged, slightly shy of two years after it first sprung. Whois data is notoriously unreliable, as is clear from all the obviously fake names, addresses, and other data that's contained in public whois records. Still, it's reasonable to assume that some people might be more forthcoming when using a supposedly privacy-enhancing service Google claimed hid such data. Even in cases where people falsified records, the records still might provide important clues about the identities of the people who made them. Often when data isn't pseudo-randomized, it follows patterns that can link the creator to a particular group or other Internet record. As Cisco researchers Nick Biasini, Alex Chiu, Jaeson Schultz, Craig Williams, and William McVey wrote: Google began warning Google Apps customers of the breach on Thursday night. An official e-mail reads: It's not particularly easy for the uninitiated to get bulk access to the 282,000 whois exposed records, especially now that two weeks have passed since the data has once again been hidden. Registrars make it difficult to download mass numbers of records, but as the Cisco researchers point out, the falsified data is now a permanent part of the Internet record that won't be hard for determined people to find. It wouldn't be surprising if now-hidden records begin selling in the black market soon. Google's breathtaking failure is a potent reminder why in most cases people do well to provide false information when registering for anything online. In some cases, accurate information is required. More often than not, things work fine with fields left blank or filled in with random characters. It's hard to know just how many people will be bitten by this epic blunder, but even if it's only 10 percent of those affected, that's a hell of a price. Update: A Google spokesman said the bug resided in the way Google Apps integrated with eNom's domain registration program interface. It was reported through Google's Vulnerability Rewards Program. The spokesman said the root cause has been identified and fixed. Source
  4. Daca aveti nevoie sa faceti un blacklist sau va sunt utile toate adresele ip routate pe un anumit numar as, puteti utiliza clientul clasic de whois din linux in felul urmator: root@pluto:~# whois AS8708 -i origin -T route |grep 'route:' route: 141.136.25.0/24 route: 176.223.191.0/24 route: 188.24.0.0/14 route: 188.241.106.0/23 route: 188.241.246.0/24 route: 193.105.58.0/24 route: 193.111.161.0/24 route: 193.111.232.0/24 route: 193.138.85.0/24 route: 193.16.213.0/24 In cazul in care nu tineti minte comanda, puteti face o functie in '~/.bashrc' de genul: function routes() { whois $1 -i origin -T route|grep 'route:' } Demo: root@pluto:~# routes AS8708 route: 141.136.25.0/24 route: 176.223.191.0/24 route: 188.24.0.0/14 route: 188.241.106.0/23 route: 188.241.246.0/24 route: 193.105.58.0/24 route: 193.111.161.0/24 route: 193.111.232.0/24 Dupa ce puneti functia in fisierul '~/.bashrc' este necesar sa dati comanda 'source ~/.bashrc' sau sa va reautentificati. La ce puteti utiliza adresele ip routate de catre un numar AS: - Limitari de banda, prioridizare de pachete - Blocare http flood dintr-o anumita retea, blacklisted, etc ... Nota: Daca nu va functioneaza, adaugati '-h whois.ripe.net' la comanda. Daca va sunt necesare doar adresele ip (sa nu mai afiseze 'route:'), folositi "|awk '{print $2}'" dupa comanda ca in exemplul de mai jos: whois -h whois.ripe.net NUMAR_AS -i origin -T route |grep 'route:' |awk '{print $2}'
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