Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'tls'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Informatii generale
    • Anunturi importante
    • Bine ai venit
    • Proiecte RST
  • Sectiunea tehnica
    • Exploituri
    • Challenges (CTF)
    • Bug Bounty
    • Programare
    • Securitate web
    • Reverse engineering & exploit development
    • Mobile security
    • Sisteme de operare si discutii hardware
    • Electronica
    • Wireless Pentesting
    • Black SEO & monetizare
  • Tutoriale
    • Tutoriale in romana
    • Tutoriale in engleza
    • Tutoriale video
  • Programe
    • Programe hacking
    • Programe securitate
    • Programe utile
    • Free stuff
  • Discutii generale
    • RST Market
    • Off-topic
    • Discutii incepatori
    • Stiri securitate
    • Linkuri
    • Cosul de gunoi
  • Club Test's Topics
  • Clubul saraciei absolute's Topics
  • Chernobyl Hackers's Topics
  • Programming & Fun's Jokes / Funny pictures (programming related!)
  • Programming & Fun's Programming
  • Programming & Fun's Programming challenges
  • Bani pă net's Topics
  • Cumparaturi online's Topics
  • Web Development's Forum
  • 3D Print's Topics

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation

Found 4 results

  1. POODLE Revine in forta. Introduction SSL 3.0 [RFC6101] is an obsolete and insecure protocol. While for most practical purposes it has been replaced by its successors TLS 1.0 [RFC2246], TLS 1.1 [RFC4346], and TLS 1.2 [RFC5246], many TLS implementations remain backwards*compatible with SSL 3.0 to interoperate with legacy systems in the interest of a smooth user experience. The protocol handshake provides for authenticated version negotiation, so normally the latest protocol version common to the client and the server will be used. The POODLE Attack To work with legacy servers, many TLS cl
  2. Security researchers have banged another nail into the coffin of the ageing RC4 encryption algorithm. The latest password recovery attacks against RC4 in TLS by Christina Garman of Johns Hopkins University, Prof. Kenny Paterson and research student Thyla van der Merwe (both of Royal Holloway, University of London) show that attacks against the scheme are getting better and easier so RC4 "needs to die", as the researchers themselves put it. The continued use of RC4 in TLS is "increasingly indefensible", the researchers conclude in an abstract of their work. The research - which also involved t
  3. Google, among several security organizations, recently announced a vulnerability in the SSL protocol, particularly SSL version 3. SSL is used to secure connections between a client and server to prevent eavesdropping, and that the data has not been tampered. SSLv3 is an old version of the SSL protocol, dating back to 1996 and debuted with Netscape Navigator. While a very old version of SSL, it is still widely supported by browsers and servers today. According to SSL Pulse, 98% of web servers support SSLv3 in October 2014. Fortunately more secure replacements for SSLv3 have existed for a long t
×
×
  • Create New...