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Found 5 results

  1. Cum se poate aduce bani cash in tara, fara a fi declarati la vama, non-transfer bancar, sume 30k+ euro, din Bulgaria?
  2. Despite anti-skimmer ATM Lobby access control system available in the market, we have seen a number of incidents in recent years where criminals used card skimmers at ATM doors. Few years back, cyber criminals started using card skimmers on the door of the ATM vestibule, where customers have to slide their credit or debit cards to gain access to the ATM. The typical ATM Skimming devices are used by fraudsters capture both magnetic stripe data contained on the back of a debit or credit card as well as the PIN number that is entered by the customer when using the ATM. In recent case discussed by Brian, cyber criminal installed the card skimming device on the ATM Lobby Card Access Control and a pinhole hidden camera pointed at the ATM's keyboard. Basically, it's an ATM skimmer that requires no modification to the ATM. The card skimmer hidden on the ATM door records the debit and credit card information, and the pinhole camera records the PIN number the victim enters. Using this information, a thief can easily run you out of cash in a matter of minutes. PROTECT YOURSELF FROM CARD SKIMMERS The easiest way to protect yourself is simply to cover the keypad with your other hand when you enter your PIN or simply use a different card (any gift card or store card with a magnetic stripe) to open the lobby doors. Also, if keyboard of the ATM looks different, do not use that ATM. If you think your password or PIN has been compromised, change it immediately. Make sure to check your financial reports regularly and for any strange activity and in case of unusual patterns of transactions, inform your bank immediately. NEXT GENERATION CARDLESS ATMs To ensure users secure transaction over ATM, a Canadian bank have come forward to adopt and launch the U.S.'s biggest cardless ATM network that allows its customers to withdraw cash within seconds without the need of any debit or credit cards, but only their smartphones. BMO Harris Bank says there is no need to enter PIN and instead of swiping the card, customers have to sign into mobile banking app "Mobile Cash", hold their smartphones over the QR code on the ATM screen and the cash gets delivered. Source
  3. Adobe has launched a bug bounty program that hands out high-fives, not cash. The web application vulnerability disclosure program announced today and launched last month operates through HackerOne used by the likes of Twitter, Yahoo!, and CloudFlare, some of which provide cash or other rewards to those who disclose security messes. Adobe's program seeks out common flaws in its online services, including cross-site scripting; privileged cross-site request forgery; server-side code execution; authentication or authorisation flaws; injection vulnerabilities; directory traversal; information disclosure, and significant security misconfiguration. "In recognition of the important role that independent security researchers play in keeping Adobe customers safe, today Adobe launches a web application vulnerability disclosure program on the HackerOne platform," wrote Adobe security program manager Pieters Ockers. "Bug hunters who identify a web application vulnerability in an Adobe online service or web property can now privately disclose the issue to Adobe while boosting their HackerOne reputation score." Hackers will need to be the first in for reporting a flaw and offer Adobe "reasonable" time to fix the flaws prior to public disclosure, Ockers says. Smaller vulnerabilities such as the following are excluded: Logout and other instances of low-severity cross-site request forgery Perceived issues with password reset links Missing http security headers Missing cookie flags on non-sensitive cookies Clickjacking on static pages The announcement comes as AirBnB this week launched its bug bounty on the popular HackerOne platform. Bug bounties work best when they offer cash, according to BugCrowd engineer Drew Sing. In vulnerability program guidelines published July he says money is the best incentive to encourage researchers to conduct more regular and intense testing of products and services. "A high priority security issue handled improperly could damage the reputation of the organisation ... the development, IT and communications team are all critical components to a successful program," Sing says. The managed bug service recommends bounties should be published in an obvious location on websites, preferably located with the /security subdomain, and sport a dedicated security contact who is well-briefed in handling disclosures. So why has Adobe decided street cred, not cash, is the way to go? Wags might wonder if the company's infamously-porous products have so many bugs that a cash bounty could dent the bottom line. Source
  4. Hackers stole from 100 banks and rigged ATMs to spew cash Hackers have stolen approximately $1 billion in what could be one of the largest bank heists ever, according to a new report from the Internet security firm Kaspersky Lab. Kaspersky said Sunday it has uncovered how hackers surreptitiously installed spying software on bank computers, eventually learned how to mimic bank employee workflows and used the knowledge to make transfers into bank accounts they had created for this theft. More than 100 banks were hit, Kaspersky said, and based on the hackers' practice of stealing between $2.5 million and $10 million from each bank, it estimated "total financial losses could be as a high as $1 billion, making this by far the most successful criminal cyber campaign we have ever seen." Kaspersky did not name the banks but said they are institutions located in 25 countries, including the United States. It also said the "attacks remain active," and provided tips for bank officials to determine if their computers are vulnerable. The thieves were Russian, Ukranian, Chinese and European, Kaspersky said. The individual thefts involved no more than $10 million apiece. Related: Congress wants banks to admit they've been hacked Kaspersky called the malware "Carbanak" and said it provided the hackers the ability to watch bank employees conduct their business. "This allowed them to see and record everything that happened on the screens of staff who serviced the cash transfer systems," Kaspersky said. "In this way the fraudsters got to know every last detail of the bank clerks' work and were able to mimic staff activity in order to transfer money and cash out." After penetrating a bank's computer systems, the hackers lurked for "two to four months" before striking in one of several ways, like changing an account balance, then transferring the excess funds into their own accounts. They also spewed cash out of ATMs when "one of the gang's henchmen was waiting beside the machine" to collect the money. An industry cybersecurity group has "disseminated intelligence on this attack to the members," according to The New York Times, which first covered the report. The Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center told the Times that "some briefings were also provided by law enforcement entities." Hackers stole from 100 banks and rigged ATMs to spew cash - Feb. 15, 2015
  5. bDyds

    Cashout btc?

    Salut, sa presupunem ca am o suma mare in bitcoini ($50000+). Care sunt alternativele mele sa fac cash out? Cunoastesti site-uri legit? Deasemenea, trebuie sa platesc impozit/sa dau explicatii cuiva?
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