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Found 10 results

  1. Today anywhere you go, you will come across Free or Public WiFi hotspots -- it makes our travel easier when we stuck without a data connection. Isn’t it? But, I think you’ll agree with me when I say: This Free WiFi hotspot service could bring you in trouble, as it could be a bait set up by hackers or cyber criminals to get access to devices that connects to the free network. This is why mobile device manufacturers provide an option in their phone settings so that the device do not automatically connects to any unknown hotspot and asks the owner for approval every time it comes across a compatible WiFi. Hackers can grab your Credit Card Data. Here’s How? Recently, security researchers from mobile security company 'Wandera' have alerted Apple users about a potential security flaw in iOS mobile operating system that could be exploited by hackers to set up a rogue WiFi spot and then fool users into giving up their personal information, including credit card details. The loophole leverages the weakness in the default behaviour of iOS devices, including iPhones, iPads and iPods, with WiFi turned on, Ars reported. This could let attackers create their malicious wireless hotspots and inject a fake "captive portal" page mimicking the genuine Apple Pay interface asking users to enter their credit card details. A hacker nearby a customer connecting an Apple Pay transaction could launch an attack in an attempt to force the victim’s mobile to connect to evil hotspot and then display a popup portal page which is designed in such a way that users could be fooled into believing Apple Pay itself is requesting to re-enter their Credit Card details. According to the researchers, spoofers can loaf around a point-of-sale (POS) machine with an Apple Pay terminal and could continuously launch the attack in order to victimize more people. However, the attack may not trick a large number of people because the fake captive portal page imitating Apple Pay interface is displayed under a fairly prominent "Log In" title bar, the report says. The simple and easiest workaround to prevent such attacks is to turn your device's Wi-Fi simply OFF if you are not intentionally connecting to a known Wireless network. Security researchers have warned Apple about the loophole and meanwhile recommended that Apple and Google should "consider adopting a secure warning when displaying captive portal pages to users so that users exercise caution." Source
  2. Researchers at Wandera, a mobile security company, have alerted Apple to a potential security vulnerability in iOS that could be used by attackers to fool users into giving up their credit card data and personal information. The vulnerability, based on the default behavior of iOS devices with Wi-Fi turned on, could be used to inject a fake "captive portal" page that imitates the Apple Pay interface. The attack leverages a well-known issue Ars has reported on in the past: iOS devices with Wi-Fi turned on will attempt by default to connect to any access point with a known SSID. Those SSIDs are broadcast by "probe" messages from the device whenever it's not connected to a network. A rogue access point could use a probe request capture to masquerade as a known network, and then throw up a pop-up screen masquerading as any web page or app. The Wandera attack uses this behavior to get a mobile device to connect and then presents a pop-up portal page—the type usually used when connecting to a public WiFi service to present a Web-based login screen—that is designed to resemble an Apple Pay screen for entering credit card data. The attack could be launched by someone nearby a customer who has just completed or is conducting an Apple Pay transaction so that the user is fooled into believing Apple Pay itself is requesting that credit card data is reentered. An attacker could loiter near a point-of-sale system with an Apple Pay terminal and continuously launch the attack. Considering that the fake captive portal page is displayed beneath a "Log In" title bar, this attack may not fool many people. “In high footfall locations, even a very small ratio of success will yield a large number of valuable credit card numbers," said Eldar Tuvey, CEO of Wandera, in a statement e-mailed to Ars. "It’s all so easy for them. Using readily available technology, which they may be discretely carrying about their person, hackers can for the first time focus their efforts where their victims are at their most susceptible—at the checkout.” The real vulnerability exploited here is iOS' automatic WiFi connection and the format in which iOS displays captive portal pages. There are some very simple ways to prevent this sort of attack—such as turning Wi-Fi off when not deliberately connecting to a network. The Wandera researchers reccommended that Apple and Google should "consider adopting a secure warning when displaying captive portal pages to users, so that users exercise caution." Additionally, they suggest that users close and re-open payment applications to enter credit card data and use the camera capture capability of the apps to input credit card data whenever possible. Ars spoke with an Apple spokesperson, and is awaiting an official response. However, as the screenshots show, this spoof looks considerably different from Apple Pay's actual interface, and a card registration screen popping up after a transaction is hardly expected behavior for the service. Apple Pay never asks for credit card data during a transaction. Ars will update this story as more information becomes available. Source
  3. Cum pot sa-mi fac contul de paypal verified daca nu am card de credit? Am incercat sa fac un card pe net pe etrades, bancore si netspend, dar nu au mers.
  4. Cum credit orange cartele sau transfer peste 2000 pe luna , Pretul ar fi o problema ,1 euro as vrea sa iasa undeva sub 4 lei. Privat.
  5. Despite anti-skimmer ATM Lobby access control system available in the market, we have seen a number of incidents in recent years where criminals used card skimmers at ATM doors. Few years back, cyber criminals started using card skimmers on the door of the ATM vestibule, where customers have to slide their credit or debit cards to gain access to the ATM. The typical ATM Skimming devices are used by fraudsters capture both magnetic stripe data contained on the back of a debit or credit card as well as the PIN number that is entered by the customer when using the ATM. In recent case discussed by Brian, cyber criminal installed the card skimming device on the ATM Lobby Card Access Control and a pinhole hidden camera pointed at the ATM's keyboard. Basically, it's an ATM skimmer that requires no modification to the ATM. The card skimmer hidden on the ATM door records the debit and credit card information, and the pinhole camera records the PIN number the victim enters. Using this information, a thief can easily run you out of cash in a matter of minutes. PROTECT YOURSELF FROM CARD SKIMMERS The easiest way to protect yourself is simply to cover the keypad with your other hand when you enter your PIN or simply use a different card (any gift card or store card with a magnetic stripe) to open the lobby doors. Also, if keyboard of the ATM looks different, do not use that ATM. If you think your password or PIN has been compromised, change it immediately. Make sure to check your financial reports regularly and for any strange activity and in case of unusual patterns of transactions, inform your bank immediately. NEXT GENERATION CARDLESS ATMs To ensure users secure transaction over ATM, a Canadian bank have come forward to adopt and launch the U.S.'s biggest cardless ATM network that allows its customers to withdraw cash within seconds without the need of any debit or credit cards, but only their smartphones. BMO Harris Bank says there is no need to enter PIN and instead of swiping the card, customers have to sign into mobile banking app "Mobile Cash", hold their smartphones over the QR code on the ATM screen and the cash gets delivered. Source
  6. Google and Firefox have upgraded their flagship browsers, crushing bugs and cracking down on bad certificates along the way. The Choc Factory's Chrome 41 swats 51 bugs of which at least 13 are classified as high severity and six considered medium risks. Google engineer Penny MacNeil thanked security researchers for the effort to identify the bugs. "We would also like to thank all security researchers that worked with us during the development cycle to prevent security bugs from ever reaching the stable channel," MacNeil says. Here's this month's ameliorated messes: [$7500][456516] High CVE-2015-1212: Out-of-bounds write in media. Credit to anonymous. [$5000][448423] High CVE-2015-1213: Out-of-bounds write in skia filters. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$5000][445810] High CVE-2015-1214: Out-of-bounds write in skia filters. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$5000][445809] High CVE-2015-1215: Out-of-bounds write in skia filters. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$4000][454954] High CVE-2015-1216: Use-after-free in v8 bindings. Credit to anonymous. [$3000][456192] High CVE-2015-1217: Type confusion in v8 bindings. Credit to anonymous. [$3000][456059] High CVE-2015-1218: Use-after-free in dom. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$3000][446164] High CVE-2015-1219: Integer overflow in webgl. Credit to Chen Zhang (demi6od) of NSFOCUS Security Team. [$3000][437651] High CVE-2015-1220: Use-after-free in gif decoder. Credit to Aki Helin of OUSPG. [$2500][455368] High CVE-2015-1221: Use-after-free in web databases. Credit to Collin Payne. [$2500][448082] High CVE-2015-1222: Use-after-free in service workers. Credit to Collin Payne. [$2000][454231] High CVE-2015-1223: Use-after-free in dom. Credit to Maksymillian Motyl. [449610] High CVE-2015-1230: Type confusion in v8. Credit to Skylined working with HP’s Zero Day Initiative. [$2000][449958] Medium CVE-2015-1224: Out-of-bounds read in vpxdecoder. Credit to Aki Helin of OUSPG. [$1000][446033] Medium CVE-2015-1225: Out-of-bounds read in pdfium. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$1000][456841] Medium CVE-2015-1226: Validation issue in debugger. Credit to Rob Wu. [$1000][450389] Medium CVE-2015-1227: Uninitialized value in blink. Credit to Christoph Diehl. [$1000][444707] Medium CVE-2015-1228: Uninitialized value in rendering. Credit to miaubiz. [$500][431504] Medium CVE-2015-1229: Cookie injection via proxies. Credit to iliwoy. Mozilla's updates Firefox version 37 include a revocation feature to bolster the killing of bad intermediate certificates. The OneCRL replaces the Online Certificate Status Protocol which is less effective because it relies on third parties to keep updated registries of their valid and revoked certificates. Certificates were often accepted as soft-fails when the status could not be determined due to some technical or connectivity failure. Mozilla's new list operates in the browser and is populated by issuers who push certificate status instead of the browser having to do the fetching. This block-list, already used for blacklisting bad plugins and drivers, will now speed up checking times because it avoids the need for Mozilla to push out updates that require browser restarts, Mozilla security boffin Mark Goodwin says. "OneCRL helps speed up revocation checking by maintaining a centralised list of revoked certificates and pushing it out to browsers. Currently, if a serious incident occurs that requires certificates to be revoked, we release an update to Firefox to address the problem. "This is slow because it takes some time for users to get the security update and restart their browsers. There’s also cost involved in producing an update and in users downloading it." Goodwin points to a blog by Google guy Adam Langley who said last year that the old revocation checking did little to improve security. OneCRL for now covers intermediate certificates to reduce the size of Mozilla's blocklist and will be later sped up by automating the collection of revoked certificates. Source
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  8. Google pushed out on Wednesday a new version of its Chrome browser (40.0.2214.91) and along with it paid out more than two dozen bounties, including 16 for memory corruption vulnerabilities. In all, 62 security vulnerabilities were patched, 17 of those considered high severity bugs by Google. Most of those high-severity vulnerabilities were memory corruption or use-after-free vulnerabilities in a number of Chrome components, including ICU, V8, FFmpeg and DOM. A researcher credited as cloudfuzzer cashed in with $12,000 worth of bounties, including three critical bugs. Another reporter known as yangdingning was awarded $9,000 for his finds. Here is the list of public vulnerabilities patched in Chrome 40. [$5000][430353] High CVE-2014-7923: Memory corruption in ICU. Credit to yangdingning. [$4500][435880] High CVE-2014-7924: Use-after-free in IndexedDB. Credit to Collin Payne. [$4000][434136] High CVE-2014-7925: Use-after-free in WebAudio. Credit to mark.buer. [$4000][422824] High CVE-2014-7926: Memory corruption in ICU. Credit to yangdingning. [$3500][444695] High CVE-2014-7927: Memory corruption in V8. Credit to Christian Holler. [$3500][435073] High CVE-2014-7928: Memory corruption in V8. Credit to Christian Holler. [$3000][442806] High CVE-2014-7930: Use-after-free in DOM. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$3000][442710] High CVE-2014-7931: Memory corruption in V8. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$2000][443115] High CVE-2014-7929: Use-after-free in DOM. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$2000][429666] High CVE-2014-7932: Use-after-free in DOM. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG. [$2000][427266] High CVE-2014-7933: Use-after-free in FFmpeg. Credit to aohelin. [$2000][427249] High CVE-2014-7934: Use-after-free in DOM. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$2000][402957] High CVE-2014-7935: Use-after-free in Speech. Credit to Khalil Zhani. [$1500][428561] High CVE-2014-7936: Use-after-free in Views. Credit to Christoph Diehl. [$1500][419060] High CVE-2014-7937: Use-after-free in FFmpeg. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG. [$1000][416323] High CVE-2014-7938: Memory corruption in Fonts. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG. [$1000][399951] High CVE-2014-7939: Same-origin-bypass in V8. Credit to Takeshi Terada. [$1000][433866] Medium CVE-2014-7940: Uninitialized-value in ICU. Credit to miaubiz. [$1000][428557] Medium CVE-2014-7941: Out-of-bounds read in UI. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG and Christoph Diehl. [$1000][426762] Medium CVE-2014-7942: Uninitialized-value in Fonts. Credit to miaubiz. [$1000][422492] Medium CVE-2014-7943: Out-of-bounds read in Skia. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG. [$1000][418881] Medium CVE-2014-7944: Out-of-bounds read in PDFium. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$1000][414310] Medium CVE-2014-7945: Out-of-bounds read in PDFium. Credit to cloudfuzzer. [$1000][414109] Medium CVE-2014-7946: Out-of-bounds read in Fonts. Credit to miaubiz. [$500][430566] Medium CVE-2014-7947: Out-of-bounds read in PDFium. Credit to fuzztercluck. [$500][414026] Medium CVE-2014-7948: Caching error in AppCache. Credit to jiayaoqijia. Google said it awarded an additional $35,000 in bounties to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG, Christian Holler, cloudfuzzer and Khalil Zhani for work done during the development cycle to keep vulnerabilities out of the stable release. This is the first Chrome release of the year; in November, Chrome 39 was released and included removal of support for the fallback to SSL 3.0, the target of the POODLE attack. Source
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